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Thread: Happy Birthday

  1. #31
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    A.J. Foyt (82)

    Foyt is perhaps the greatest racing driver of all-time.


    Yes, perhaps he is. Perhaps. If he'd been interested and more lithe, he might have done F1.....and showed them fancy-pants Europeans somethin'....or not.

  2. #32
    January 17:

    John Duff (1895-1958)

    Duff was the winner of the 1924 24 Hours of Le Mans. He would compete in the 1926 Indianapolis 500 and is the only person born in China to qualify for the race (although he raced as a Canadian, since both of his parents were from Canada). He would finish 9th. He would then finish 3rd at Altoona. He then suffered career-ending injuries at Rockingham. After his racing career, he began to teach fencing. Then he became a steeplechaser and show jumper before dying in a riding accident in 1958. Here he is at Indianapolis:



    George Landry (1924-2007)

    Landry was a stock car and ARDC midget driver. His only Indy car appearance was at Langhorne in 1966, where he failed to qualify. It is possible that he may have never even made it to the track, since he has no team, chassis or engine listed. Here he is as a crew member for Dave Harris at Claremont Speedway in 1953 (he's the one with the black hair):



    Mickey Rupp (81)

    Rupp only competed in five races, but finished in the top 10 three times, including a 6th at the 1965 Indianapolis 500 and a 5th at the following race at Milwaukee. Prior to this, he formed Rupp Industries, a company that made go-karts, mini bikes, motorcycles and snowmobiles. Here he is after qualifying in 1965:



    Eddie Miller (72)

    Miller was the 1975 SCCA Super Vee champion. He then was entered in the 1976 500. However, he crashed in turn 1 and went flipping past the inside retaining wall (had the crash happened today, he would have likely landed on several seats) during practice. He would suffer a broken neck and back. He would compete in Super Vees in 1977 and 1978, but never competed in another Indy car race. Here he is at a Formula 5000 race at Michigan in 1973:


  3. #33
    Registered User Liz's Avatar
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    Great thread, thanks so much!
    #BCForever

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Liz View Post
    Great thread, thanks so much!
    You're welcome.

  5. #35
    January 18 (nine birthdays today):

    Robert Pennebaker (1887-1971)

    Pennebaker's only appearance was at the 1913 Indianapolis 500, where he failed to qualify. No picture is available.

    Jim Parsons (1891-1976)

    Parsons was primarily a West Coast driver in Indy cars between in 1914 and 1916. His best finish would be a 2nd at Phoenix in 1915 (he also finished 2nd at an exhibition race at Fresno in 1916). Here he is at Venice in 1915, as he spins, although he still finished 9th:



    Dusty Fahrnow (1903-1981)

    Fahrnow attempted to qualify for each Indianapolis 500 from 1931 to 1936. He would only qualify in 1934, finishing 24th. He also relieved Joe Huff for 56 laps in 1932 and Huff finished 10th. Here he is in 1934:



    Johnny White (1932-1977)

    White started off his career with five top 10s in seven races in 1963. He then finished 4th at the 1964 Indianapolis 500, winning Rookie of the Year. However, just over a week later at Terre Haute, he was paralyzed from the neck down in a sprint car crash, ending his career. His health would decline and he would die in 1977. Here he is after qualifying in 1964:



    Pedro Rodriguez (1940-1971)

    Rodriguez won two Formula One races. He also won the 1968 24 Hours of Le Mans and the 24 Hours of Daytona four times (1963, 1964, 1970 and 1971, although the race was not 24 hours the first two times). He would also attempt, but fail, to qualify at the Indianapolis 500 in 1963, 1964 and 1967. He would later be killed at the 1971 200 Miles of Norisring. Here he is in 1963:



    Jimmy Caruthers (1945-1975)

    Caruthers was the 1970 USAC National Midget and 1975 USAC Silver Crown championship. He was a rising star in Indy cars, with his best season being 1974, where he finished 2nd twice and finished 5th in points. However, he died of cancer in 1975 (before he even could get the Silver Crown championship trophy). Here he is after qualifying for the 1974 Indianapolis 500, where he finished 23rd:



    Hubert Stromberger (54)

    Stromberger was an Austrian driver who had previously competed in Formula Opel. He would attempt three races in 1995, finishing 16th in his debut at Road America and failing to qualify at Cleveland and Mid-Ohio. Here he is at the latter:



    Andre Ribeiro (51)

    Ribeiro was the first driver to win an IndyCar race with a Honda engine, doing so at New Hampshire in 1995 from the pole position. He then won at Rio and Michigan the next year. He joined Team Penske in 1998, but struggled after a bad crash at Nazareth. He would retire at the end of the year, but is still involved in Penske's business in Brazil. Here he is on his way to his first win:



    Christian Fittipaldi (46)

    The nephew of Emerson Fittipaldi, Christian Fittipaldi started 135 races between 1995 and 2002. He would win at Road America in 1999 and Fontana in 2000. He now drives sports cars, winning the 24 Hours of Daytona in 2004 and 2014 and the IMSA Prototype championship in 2014 and 2015. Here he is after qualifying for the 1995 Indianapolis 500, where he finished 2nd and won Rookie of the Year (it would be his only start in the race due to The Split):


  6. #36
    The substitute irlrules98's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    January 16:

    Rollie Beale (1930-2014)

    Beale was the 1973 USAC Sprint Car champion. He would attempt 20 Indy car races between 1967 and 1970, but would only qualify for seven. His best finish would be a 9th at Trenton in 1968. Here he is at a USAC Sprint Car race at Salem in 1973:



    This car sits in Don Harrells shop in Temperance, Mi still
    Indy made AJ Foyt

  7. #37
    Insider Frank Capua's Avatar
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    Hmmm... The Rodeo Bar, a Bar that is capable of sponsoring two USAC sprint cars.

    Sounds like a Bar I wouldn't mind hanging out in.

    "Ride the Barrel and get pitted... So Pitted."



  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by irlrules98 View Post
    This car sits in Don Harrells shop in Temperance, Mi still
    Rollie Beale was one of my all-time favorite people.
    "Pete, do you ever get tired of the nonsense, lately I sometimes get very tired, very tired." Jean-Pierre Sarti on TF.

  9. #39
    The substitute irlrules98's Avatar
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    Rollie was a great guy. Miss him greatly. The Rodeo Bar is long gone also. Don Harrell is still kicking. Restoring Model T's lately, at a nice leisurely pace.

  10. #40
    January 19:

    Marion Trexler (1891-1968)

    Trexler first appeared in 1912 at Columbus and finished 9th. His next appearance was at the 1930 Indianapolis 500, where he finished 34th. He returned to the 500 the next two years, but failed to qualify both times. Here he is in 1930:



    Joe Caccia (1899-1931)

    Caccia finished 24th at the 1930 500. However, he would be killed in practice the next year. Here he is in 1930:



    Peter Kreis (1900-1934)

    Kreis started 27 races between 1924 and 1934. His best finish would be three 2nds. He and riding mechanic Robert Hahn were killed during practice for the 1934 Indianapolis 500. Here he is after qualifying in 1927, where he finished 17th:



    Red Amick (1929-1995)

    Amick started six races between 1953 and 1963. His best finish would be an 11th at the 1960 Indianapolis 500. He also finished 10th at an exhibition race at Williams Grove in 1959. Here he is after qualifying for the 1959 500, where he finished 31st:



    Don Nordhorn (83)

    Nordhorn was a regular USAC Sprint Car driver. He would attempt three races in 1969 and finished 10th at Nazareth and would fail to qualify for his other races. Here he is at the 1971 Tony Hulman Classic in car #7:



    Tarso Marques (41)

    After two partial seasons in Formula One, Marques drove six races for Team Penske in 1999, getting a best finish of 9th at Rio. He would get a career-best finish of 7th the following year at Fontana. He would return to Formula One and then back to Champ Car. He infamously retired from Monterrey in 2004 due a tow rope getting into his suspension after he was not holding the right way. Here he is at Portland in 1999.

    Last edited by Rhino Ryan; 01-21-2017 at 10:30 PM.

  11. #41
    January 20:

    Fireball Roberts (1931-1964)

    Roberts won 33 NASCAR Cup Series races, including the 1962 Daytona 500. He was inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame in 2014. He also participated in two exhibition NASCAR Speedway Division time trial races, finishing 2nd at Daytona Beach in 1952 and 3rd in 1953. Here he poses with his Daytona 500-winning car:



    Bobby Allen (74)

    Allen was a sprint car driver who attempted, but failed, to qualify at Phoenix in 1970. Here he poses with his sprint car:



    Bobby Adkins (61)

    Adkins competed in both USAC and World of Outlaws. He was entered in the USAC Gold Crown 1981 Hoosier Hundred, but was replaced by Jack Hewitt. Here he is at Eldora in 1987 (it's the best that I could find):



    Jeff Wood (60)

    Wood was the 1985 Atlantic Pacific championship. He would drive in CART between 1983 and 1994. His best finish would be in his second race, an 8th at Laguna Seca in 1983. Here he is in 1990 at Road America, where he finished 23rd:



    Norberto Fontana (42)

    Fontana first drove in four Formula One races in 1997. He then moved to CART in 2000. He would get a best finish of 11th at Cleveland before getting released from the team following the next race at Toronto. Here he is at Long Beach that year, where he finished 15th:

    Last edited by Rhino Ryan; 02-07-2017 at 04:59 PM.

  12. #42
    no longer a mere Hobbyist Michael Ferner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    January 20:

    Fireball Roberts (1931-1964)

    (...)

    Bob Allen (78)

    (...)

    Bobby Atkins (61)
    What exactly are your criteria for inclusion in this list? Fireball Roberts??

    And what are your sources? The Bob Allen who competed at Phoenix in 1970 never raced F5000 or CanAm, he prefered dirt track racing and Sprint cars. Also, I don't know who Bobby Atkins is or was, but if it's Bobby Adkins you're thinking of, he competed in about a dozen National Dirt Track/Silver Crown events, not to speak of the hundreds of Sprint car races in many clubs and organizations. Again, what are your criteria???

  13. #43
    Insider Frank Capua's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    January 20:

    Fireball Roberts (1931-1964)

    Roberts won 33 NASCAR Cup Series races, including the 1962 Daytona 500. He was inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame in 2014. His Indy car career consisted of two exhibition NASCAR Speedway Division races, finishing 2nd at Daytona Beach in 1952 and 3rd in 1953. Here he poses with his Daytona 500-winning car:


    Fireball Roberts was the only NASCAR driver that I was ever a fan of because of their NASCAR careers... There are a couple others that I was a fan of but I was one long before they took up NASCAR. However I'm not familiar with NASCAR's Speedway Division. What were they exactly? Were they cars that would have qualified under AAA Indy Car rules back in 1953?

  14. #44
    no longer a mere Hobbyist Michael Ferner's Avatar
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    NASCAR Speedway Divison was a local Big Car organization that ran only two years, 1952 &'53, all along the Eastern seaboard (from NY to FL). I don't know much about rules, but stock engines appear to have been compulsory. I don't think that many would've been eligible under AAA rules.

  15. #45
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    That isn't Red Amick in the picture, it is Mike Magill.

    picture changed to Red now. Wheeler Foutch car.
    Last edited by Niseguy; 01-31-2017 at 09:16 AM.
    "Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved
    body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting
    "...holy $^!+...what a ride!"
    >

  16. #46
    Though very limited, Fireball did run "Indy Cars" in the NASCAR Speed Division but, didn't run any points races. The cars had "Stock" motors. Kind of a stretch but, Champ Car stats ARE found here: http://www.champcarstats.com/drivers...tsFireball.htm


    Red Amick 1959 Rookie year at the Speedway: http://d2i8ejbvsgsqtt.cloudfront.net...d/imsc6187.jpg

  17. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Ferner View Post
    What exactly are your criteria for inclusion in this list? Fireball Roberts??

    And what are your sources? The Bob Allen who competed at Phoenix in 1970 never raced F5000 or CanAm, he prefered dirt track racing and Sprint cars. Also, I don't know who Bobby Atkins is or was, but if it's Bobby Adkins you're thinking of, he competed in about a dozen National Dirt Track/Silver Crown events, not to speak of the hundreds of Sprint car races in many clubs and organizations. Again, what are your criteria???
    The only Bob Allen that I could find that was a racing driver was one who drove in SCCA, Formula 5000 and Can-Am.

    http://www.racingsportscars.com/driv...Allen-USA.html
    http://www.racingsportscars.com/driv...Allen-USA.html
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1975_L...ach_Grand_Prix

    I think that we're talking about the same Bobby Adkins, I just must have happened to misread his name, it happens sometimes.

    As for my criteria, I get it from champcarstats.com (http://www.champcarstats.com/).
    Last edited by Rhino Ryan; 01-21-2017 at 11:44 PM.

  18. #48
    January 21:

    DeLloyd Thompson (1888-1949)

    Thompson was an aviator who set the flight altitude record in 1914. He would later compete at two races at Uniontown in 1918, finishing 7th in both. Here he is at the Chicago Air Show on the right:



    Charles Tramison (1904-1967)

    Tramison attempted fiv races from 1934 to 1936. He qualified for the 1934 Indianapolis 500, but used more fuel than was allowed and he was removed from the field. He would qualify at Altoona the following year and finished 11th. No picture is available.

    Earl Kouba (1918-1992)

    Kouba competed in the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb from 1958 to 1961, when it did not count towards the championship. His best finish was an 11th in 1961. Here he is in 1958:



    Jud Larson (1923-1966)

    Larson won five dirt track races between 1956 and 1958. However, this success did nor translate to paved tracks as he only qualified for the 500 twice in six attempts. Here he is at the 1964 Hoosier Hundred, where he finished 4th:



    Johnny Wood (1927-1963)

    Wood was a regular competitor in both USAC and CRA. He would attempt, by fail, to qualify at Phoenix in 1959. No picture is available.

    Alex Sperafico (43)

    Sperafico was the oldest of four brothers, who were all racing drivers. He would drive 12 races between 2003 and 2005 and would get a best finish of 8th at Toronto in 2005. Here he is at Road America in 2004, where he finished 17th:



    David Besnard (40)

    Besnard was a Supercars driver who competed at his home race of Surfers Paradise in 2004, finishing 7th. Here he is at that race:

    Last edited by Rhino Ryan; 01-22-2017 at 12:05 AM.

  19. #49
    no longer a mere Hobbyist Michael Ferner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    The only Bob Allen that I could find that was a racing driver was one who drove in SCCA, Formula 5000 and Can-Am.

    http://www.racingsportscars.com/driv...Allen-USA.html
    http://www.racingsportscars.com/driv...Allen-USA.html
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1975_L...ach_Grand_Prix
    Try this one, far more famous:

    https://www.sprintcarhof.com/FileGet.aspx?ID=110

    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    I think that we're talking about the same Bobby Adkins, I just must have happened to misread his name, it happens sometimes.

    As for my criteria, I get it from champcarstats.com (http://www.champcarstats.com/).
    Fair enough. Although, I still don't understand what qualifies the NASCAR races as "Indycar" events.

  20. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Ferner View Post
    The Bobby Allen you listed did attempt two Indy car races, failing to qualify at Trenton in 1971 and starting a USAC Gold Crown race at Nazareth in 1982. (http://www.champcarstats.com/drivers/AllenBobby.htm). The Bob Allen that I listed was born four years earlier and attempted to qualify at Phoenix in 1970. (http://www.champcarstats.com/drivers/AllenBob.htm).

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Ferner View Post
    Fair enough. Although, I still don't understand what qualifies the NASCAR races as "Indycar" events.
    The NASCAR Speedway Division was a short-lived NASCAR series that used older Indy cars with stock car engines in them.

  21. #51
    January 22:

    Bob Sall (1908-1974)

    Sall won the most AAA Sprint Car races prior to World War II. He would start four Indy car races between 1934 and 1936. He would get a best finish of 3rd at Syracuse in 1937 after starting 2nd. He would later become a NASCAR official. Here he sits in his car in the garage area at the 1935 Indianapolis 500, where he finished 29th:



    Gonzalo Rodriguez (1971-1999)

    After a career in Formula 3000, Rodriguez started to compete in CART in 1999. He would drive for Team Penske at Detroit and finished 12th. He was then signed on to drive for Patrick Racing in 2000. However, he was killed during practice at Laguna Seca. Here he is at Detroit:



    Felipe Giaffone (42)

    Giaffone was the 2001 IRL Rookie of the Year. He then won at Kentucky the following year and was 4th in points. However, he was injured at Kansas in 2003. He would continue to race Indy cars part-time through 2006. He currently competes in Formula Truck, where he is a four-time champion (2007, 2009, 2011 and 2016). Here he is on his was to his victory at Kentucky:


  22. #52
    no longer a mere Hobbyist Michael Ferner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    The Bobby Allen you listed did attempt two Indy car races, failing to qualify at Trenton in 1971 and starting a USAC Gold Crown race at Nazareth in 1982. (http://www.champcarstats.com/drivers/AllenBobby.htm). The Bob Allen that I listed was born four years earlier and attempted to qualify at Phoenix in 1970. (http://www.champcarstats.com/drivers/AllenBob.htm).
    Er, no. Champcarstats is simply wrong about that. The California Bob Allen never drove Indy cars, at least not in competition.


    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    The NASCAR Speedway Division was a short-lived NASCAR series that used older Indy cars with stock car engines in them.
    So did virtually every other Sprint car series in the US, as well as many Super Modified circuits. Where do you draw the line?

  23. #53
    January 23:

    Will Jones (1889-1972)

    Jones competed in the 1911 Indianapolis 500 and finished 28th after steering issues. Here he sits in his car prior to the race:

    http://cargeekjournal.com/wp-content...5/Case0001.jpg

    Art Scovell (1910-1954)

    Scovell first attempted, but failed, to qualify for the 1947 500. He then qualified at Milwaukee and Langhorne, finishing 10th and 14th. Here he is in a sprint car at Silverlake, Washington in 1951:



    Jerry Grant (1935-2012)

    Grant had several cases of bad luck in his career. At the 1966 12 Hours of Sebring, co-driver Dan Gurney had the car quit with two minutes left and decided to push the car, disqualifying both. Had Gurney done nothing, they would have gotten 2nd. He was leading the 1972 500 when he pitted to replace a bad tire. He would have finished 2nd, but because he took fuel from teammate Bobby Unser's pit, his laps after the pit stop were removed from the record and he finished 12th. Later that year, he was the first person to officially to 200 mph in an Indy car, doing so during qualifying at Ontario. However, he blew an engine before the start of the race. His best finish would be a 3rd at Ontario in 1974. Here he is after qualifying in 1972:



    Don Whittington (71)

    Whittington was a road racer who was a co-winner with brother Bill Whittington and Klaus Ludwig at the 1979 24 Hours of Le Mans (although Ludwig did most of the driving). He began compete in Indy cars later that year. Despite his background, all of his starts came on ovals. His best finish would be a 6th at the 1982 Indianapolis 500. In 1986, he was sentenced to 18 months in prison after pleading guilty to tax evasion and being part of a marijuana smuggling operation. Here he is after qualifying for the 1983 500, where he finished 27th:



    John Wood (65)

    Wood was a sports car driver who competed in Indy cars in 1980. He would finish 12th at Ontario, then failed to qualify at Indianapolis and Pocono. He then finished 23rd at Mid-Ohio and failed to qualify at Milwaukee. Afterwards, he returned to sports cars. Here he is at the 1979 24 Hours of Daytona:



    James McElreath (1954-1977)

    McElreath was the son of Indy car winner Jim McElreath. The two attempted to be the first father/son combination to qualify for the 500, but James failed to qualify. His best finish would be 7ths at Texas and Trenton that year. He would later be killed at Winchester that year in a sprint car crash. Here he is at a USAC Sprint Car race in 1977:


  24. #54
    January 24:

    Art Cross (1918-2005)

    Cross started seven races between 1952 and 1955. He would finish in the top 10 in five races. He was the first Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year, doing so in 1952 with a 5th place finish. He then finished 2nd in 1953. He was the only driver besides winner Bill Vukovich to drive without relief in the hottest 500 in history. Here he is that year:



    Jerry Nemire (71)

    Nemire was a USAC driver who started all but one Silver Crown races that counted towards the Gold Crown championship. His best finish was a 7th at DuQuoin in 1981. Here he is at Reading in 1973:



    Scott Speed (34)

    After a career in Formula One (where he was the final full-time American to compete, as of 2016), Speed moved to the NASCAR Cup Series. When he did not have a car to drive in NASCAR, he was entered in the 2011 Indianapolis 500. However, he would leave his team on the morning of Bump Day. He now competes in the Global RallyCross Championship, where he was champion in 2015 and 2016. Here he is at Indianapolis:


  25. #55
    January 25:

    Ab Jenkins (1883-1956)

    Jenkins was a land speed record drive who had more automobile records than any other person. He later established the Bonneville Salt Flats as a location for land speed records. He would later serve as mayor of Salt Lake City from 1940 to 1944. His only Indy car appearance was the 1931 Indianapolis 500, but he withdrew due to an illness. Here he poses with the Duesenberg Mormon Meteor III in 1937 at Bonneville:



    Martin de Alzaga (1901-1982)

    De Alzaga was a wealthy sportsman from Argentina. He competed in various grand prix internationally. He would also bring a team of Buggatis to the 1923 Indianapolis 500. He would qualify 4th but broke a connecting rod after six laps and finished 24th (last). He later relieved Bennett Hill in the race. Here he is after qualifying:



    Lou Johnson (93)

    Johnson's only appearance was at an exhibition NASCAR Speedway Division race at Daytona Beach in 1953. However, he did not start due to engine failure. Here he sits in a midget:



    Jaques Lazier (46)

    The younger brother of 1996 500 winner Buddy Lazier, Jaques Lazier seemed to be coming into his own in 2001 when he won at Chicagoland in his second race with Team Menard. However, he was then injured at Nazareth the following year. He would continue to drive through 2010 for various teams part-time and only got a best finish of 6th at Phoenix in 2003. Here he is on his way to his win:


  26. #56
    January 26:

    George Abell (1901-1958)

    Abell's only race was at Culver City in 1927, where he finished 10th. He also drove relief for Fred Frame (who finished 11th) at that year's Indianapolis 500. Here he is at Culver City:



    Doc Shanebrook (1907-1976)

    Shanebrook was a doctor who was also a midget driver who attempted four races between 1951 and 1952, but failed to qualify for each of them. Here he is at Milwaukee in 1951:



    Johnny Ulesky (1910-2002)

    Ulesky's only appearance was at an exhibition race at Langhorne in 1940. However, it is unknown if he actually qualified for the race. No picture is available.

    Richard Antinucci (36)

    After finishing 2nd in the 2008 Indy Lights standings, Antinucci drove in five IndyCar races in 2009. His best finish would be at Sonoma, where he finished 15th. Here he is at that race:


  27. #57
    January 27:

    George Follmer (83)

    Follmer was primarily a road racing driver. He was the Can-Am and Trans-Am champion in 1972 and repeated the latter in 1976. He also finished 3rd at the 1973 Spanish Grand Prix in his only season in Formula One. He also drove Indy cars part-time between 1967 and 1975. He would win at Phoenix in 1969. Here he is after qualifying for the 1969 Indianapolis 500, where he started and finished 27th:



    Dan Murphy (1942-2008)

    Murphy built cars in the SCCA called Cicadas. He started six races in 1974 in a car of his own design and got a best finish of 7th at Michigan. Here he sits in a Cicada Formula B car:


  28. #58
    January 28:

    Fred Ellis (1889-1958)

    Ellis started four races at Indianapolis from 1909 to 1911. His best finish was a 6th at the first race in 1909. Here he sits in his car at the 1911 Indianapolis 500, where he finished 38th due to carburetor trouble:



    Gene Hartley (1926-1993)

    Hartley was the 1959 USAC National Midget champion. His best finish in an Indy car was a 2nd at Langhorne in 1956. Here he is after qualifying for his final race, the 1962 500, where he finished 27th:



    Jimmy Bryan (1926-1960)

    Bryan could perhaps be the best IndyCar driver of the 1950s. He won the 500 in 1958, was national champion in 1954, 1956 and 1957 and was the overall winner of the Race of Two Worlds at Monza in 1957 (he won the first two heat races and finished 2nd in the other). He would be killed at Langhorne in 1960 when he drove in place of Rodger Ward and crashed on the first lap after starting 2nd. Here he sits in his 500 winning car, cigar in mouth and all:



    Jim Adams (80)

    Adams was a sports car driver who was entered in the 1966 500. However, he was declined due to a lack of experience. Here he is at a Can-Am race at Monterey that year:



    Takuma Sato (40)

    After a six-year Formula One career, Sato moved to IndyCar in 2010. He became the first Japanese driver to win an IndyCar race when he did so at Long Beach in 2013. He had previously been the first Japanese driver to qualify on the pole position for an IndyCar race (Iowa in 2011). Here he is after his win:


  29. #59
    no longer a mere Hobbyist Michael Ferner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    January 26:

    Johnny Ulesky (1910-2002)

    Ulesky's only appearance was at an exhibition race at Langhorne in 1940. However, it is unknown if he actually qualified for the race. No picture is available.

  30. #60
    January 29:

    Barney Oldfield (1878-1946)

    In the early 20th century, Oldfield was one of the most dominant racing drivers. He has the distinction of being the first Indy car champion, when he won the 1905 AAA National Circuit Championship on the strength of five wins. Here he sits in his car after qualifying for the 1914 Indianapolis 500, where he finished 5th:



    Johnny McDowell (1915-1952)

    McDowell drove between 1948 and 1952. His best finish would be 7ths at Arlington and Trenton in 1949. However, he got three pole positions in 1951. He would be killed during qualifying at Milwaukee in 1952. Here he is after qualifying for the 1951 500, where he finished 32nd:



    Jerry Hoyt (1929-1955)

    Hoyt's best finish in an Indy car was a 3rd at Milwaukee in 1953. At the 1955 Indianapolis 500, high winds caused drivers to make a pact not to make a qualifying attempt that day. However, Hoyt's team was working on the car in the garage and were not aware of this. Hoyt then made a qualifying attempt and wound up on the pole position (only one other car completed a qualifying run). He had the 10th fastest speed in the field. In the race, he finished 31st due to an oil leak after 40 laps. He would be killed just over a month later in a sprint car race in Oklahoma City. Here he is after he got his pole:



    Alex Figge (36)

    Figge competed in the final season of Champ Car in 2007 and got a best finish of 8th in his debut at Las Vegas. He then competed in the final Champ Car race at Long Beach the following year and finished 14th. Here he is at Road America in 2007, where he finished 13th:


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