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Thread: Happy Birthday

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    January 27:


    Dan Murphy (1942-2008)

    Murphy built cars in the SCCA called Cicadas. He started six races in 1974 in a car of his own design and got a best finish of 7th at Michigan. Here he sits in a Cicada Formula B car:
    Murphy was also one of the few drivers with one leg that attempted to run at Indianapolis and as you noted did drive in other Championship events.

  2. #62
    January 30:

    Ed Madden (1885-1940)

    Madden first drove relief for Harry Endicott in the 1913 Indianapolis 500. He then finished 2nd at Columbus in his only race where he was the starting driver. Here he is as Endicott's riding mechanic at the 1911 Indianapolis 500:



    Rudolf Caracciola (1901-1959)

    Caracciola was a Mercedes-Benz driver in the 1930s who won the European Championship in 1935, 1937 and 1938. His Indy car career consisted of the 1937 Vanderbilt Cup, where he qualified on the pole position, but finished 24th due to a broken turbocharger. He then entered the 1946 500, but crashed in practice after hitting a bird and was in a coma for several days. He was taken care of by the Hulman family and as a thank you, he donated his trophy collection to the them. Here he sits in his car at the 1937 Vanderbilt Cup:



    Keith "Porky" Rachwitz (1925-1981)

    Rachwitz was a midget driver who qualified for 10 races out of 23 attempts. His best finish were 9th at Las Vegas in 1968 (a road course) and Phoenix in 1969. Here he is in a sprint car at Hutchinson, Kansas in 1958:



    Tommy Copp (1927-1992)

    Copp was another midget driver. He failed to qualify in 10 of his first 11 races. However, in the nine races he did start, he got three top 10s. Here he sits in his car that he failed to qualify with at the 1962 Indianapolis 500:



    Al Smith (1929-1985)

    Smith was a sprint car driver who drove Indy cars from 1966 to 1969. His best finish was a 5th in his debut race, Atlanta in 1966. Like all other Smiths, he failed to qualify for the Indianapolis 500. Here he is in a sprint car race at Winchester in 1967 (it's the best picture I could find):

    Last edited by Rhino Ryan; 02-02-2017 at 09:17 PM.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    January 30:

    Keith "Porky" Rachwitz (1925-1981).
    Rachwitz was a sprint car driver who qualified for 10 races out of 23 attempts. His best finish were 9th at Las Vegas in 1968 (a road course) and Phoenix in 1969. Here he is in a sprint car at Hutchinson, Kansas in 1958
    While Rachwitz raced a bit of everything, he's better known as a midget racer.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    Tommy Copp (1927-1992)

    Copp was another sprint car driver. He failed to qualify in 10 of his first 11 races. However, in the nine races he did start, he got three top 10s.
    Tommy Copp rarely drove sprint cars. He was a noted midget racer, which is what he did almost exclusively in his career aside from the Indy Car (USAC Championship) starts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    Al Smith (1929-1985)

    Smith drove modifieds, stock cars and sprint cars. He also drove Indy cars from 1966 to 1969. His best finish was a 5th in his debut race, Atlanta in 1966. Here he is in a modified race at an unknown date and track in number 7:

    This is not the Al Smith you describe, it's a different Al Smith. It is a very common name. The Al Smith that drove Indy Cars (well, USAC Championship cars) was from Dayton, Ohio. The Al Smith pictured is from Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, raced super modifieds around the Pacific Northwest and is the brother of Roy Smith, a multi-time NASCAR Western series champ who also raced super modifieds.
    Last edited by JThur1; 01-31-2017 at 03:06 PM.
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  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    January 30:


    Ah, Rudy Caracciola in the mighty w125.

    Long, long ago, in a place far, far away when men and cars had balls of steel............

    One hot lap in that, Lewis Hamilton wold have to change his diaper.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnormanh View Post
    Ah, Rudy Caracciola in the mighty w125.

    Long, long ago, in a place far, far away when men and cars had balls of steel............

    One hot lap in that, Lewis Hamilton wold have to change his diaper.
    Apples and oranges. Each generation is as brave and/or tough as it needs to be. They deal with conditions as they are; they can't do otherwise.

    It would not be a great idea to talk like that to the Bryan Clauson family. Nor to suggest to Mr. Hamilton that he is lacking in bravery.

    Safer does not equal safe.

  6. #66
    January 31:

    Bill Cantrell (1908-1996)

    Cantrell was a hydroplane driver who won the 1949 Gold Cup. He also qualified for three Indy car races and got a best finish of 7th at DuQuoin in 1948. Here he is after qualifying for the 1948 Indianapolis 500, where he finished 16th:



    Mauro Baldi (63)

    After a career in Formula One, Baldi won the triple crown of sports car racing (24 Hours of Le Mans, 24 Hours of Daytona and 12 Hours of Sebring). Between this, he drove an Indy car at Mid-Ohio in 1994 and finished 19th. Here he is at the 1983 Dutch Grand Prix:



    Robbie Groff (51)

    After winning five Indy Lights races, Groff started nine races in 1994, 1997 and 1998. His best finish was a 9th at the 1997 500. Here he is at Long Beach in 1994, where he finished 13th:



    J.J. Lehto (51)

    Lehto was the winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1995 and 2005. He drove in CART in 1998 and got a best finish of 5th at Surfers Paradise. In 2011, Lehto was sentenced to prison due to drunk sailing that resulted in the death of a passenger. However, he appealed the decision and was released from prison the following year due to inconclusive evidence. Here he is at Cleveland in 1998, where he finished 28th due to a crash:



    Buddy Rice (41)

    Rice started his IndyCar career with a 2nd in his debut at Michigan in 2002. He then won the rain-shortened 2004 Indianapolis 500 from the pole position and won at Kansas and Michigan later that year. However, he suffered a concussion in a practice crash for the 2005 500 and his results became less consistent. Currently, he competes in IMSA. Here he is on his way to his 500 win:


  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    This is something that I thought would be interesting to do. This was done a few years ago (http://www.trackforum.com/forums/pri...t=159060&pp=30), but there have been other drivers to compete in IndyCar since and by the end of that thread, it was just listing the people born on that day with no other information.

    So let's begin.

    January 1:

    Phil Caliva (72)

    Flyin' Phil Caliva started 10 races between 1979 and 1984. His best finish would be an 8th, albeit 15 laps down, at the 1981 Michigan 500 after starting 37th. He also posted an official qualifying lap of about 150 mph at the 1981 Indianapolis 500 (he never would qualify for the 500 in his five attempts). Here he is at Riverside in 1983:

    Neat thread. I'd never seen a color picture of the "McLightning" before.
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  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
    Apples and oranges. Each generation is as brave and/or tough as it needs to be. They deal with conditions as they are; they can't do otherwise.

    It would not be a great idea to talk like that to the Bryan Clauson family. Nor to suggest to Mr. Hamilton that he is lacking in bravery.

    Safer does not equal safe.
    Bryan Clauson died doing what he wanted to do. I'm sure he knew the risks, and chose to take them. That doesn't mean I don't care about his death. I hate it when any driver is injured, but it is always a known possibility.

    But to compare Hamilton, or any other modern driver's risk to those of the 1930s is apples/oranges.

    33 drivers started at Indy in 1955. Seventeen of died in racing accidents. What's the risk of the starters in 2016? Maybe 1 or 2 of 33? Maybe zero?

    They stopped the race when Dan Wheldon was killed. They didn't stop a race for Vukovich in '55, nor for McDonald/Sachs in '64. Wheldon was an exception. Vuky, McDonald and Sachs were business as usual.

    Racing is safer now. By far.

    "Safer isn't safe?"

    So? Nothing is totally safe. Driving to the grocery store isn't 100% safe. Sitting in a hammock in your backyard isn't 100% safe either. But we think those things are "safe".

    And, by comparison to 50 or 80 years ago, racing is pretty damned safe.

    What racer of today, excepting only Alex Zanardi, attempted a comeback like Rudy C.? Would Hamilton?

    And, do you really think that Lewis Hamilton of today would take to the track in as evil a machine as the W124?

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnormanh View Post
    Bryan Clauson died doing what he wanted to do. I'm sure he knew the risks, and chose to take them. That doesn't mean I don't care about his death. I hate it when any driver is injured, but it is always a known possibility.

    But to compare Hamilton, or any other modern driver's risk to those of the 1930s is apples/oranges.

    33 drivers started at Indy in 1955. Seventeen of died in racing accidents. What's the risk of the starters in 2016? Maybe 1 or 2 of 33? Maybe zero?

    They stopped the race when Dan Wheldon was killed. They didn't stop a race for Vukovich in '55, nor for McDonald/Sachs in '64. Wheldon was an exception. Vuky, McDonald and Sachs were business as usual.

    Racing is safer now. By far.

    "Safer isn't safe?"

    So? Nothing is totally safe. Driving to the grocery store isn't 100% safe. Sitting in a hammock in your backyard isn't 100% safe either. But we think those things are "safe".

    And, by comparison to 50 or 80 years ago, racing is pretty damned safe.

    What racer of today, excepting only Alex Zanardi, attempted a comeback like Rudy C.? Would Hamilton?

    And, do you really think that Lewis Hamilton of today would take to the track in as evil a machine as the W124?

    I'm not sure why you continue to insist on belittling the drivers of today to make your points about the past but you feel the need to do so for some reason.

    As for Dan Wheldon and Vukovich and MacDonald as I have pointed out on at least a dozen occasions not only are those apples and oranges comparisons they might as well be apples vs. manatees.

    There's nothing remotely similar about those scenarios with the exception that they were tragedies.
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  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnormanh View Post

    What racer of today, excepting only Alex Zanardi, attempted a comeback like Rudy C.?
    Let's see.

    How about two on the same team.

    James Hinchcliffe and Mikhail Aleshin.

  11. #71
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    Commensurately, it's a glorification of death. Maybe even more so. Hemingway-esque and all.

    This is a great topic for discussion, but here, it's OT and overrunning Rhino Ryan's Happy Birthday thread.

  12. #72
    February 1:

    Ray Pixley (1907-1936)

    Pixley was a sprint car driver who qualified for the 1936 Indianapolis 500. He had the 7th fastest speed, but started 25th, and finished 6th. Unfortunately, he was killed later that year at Roby Speedway. Here he is after qualifying for the 500:


  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by JThur1 View Post
    Commensurately, it's a glorification of death. Maybe even more so. Hemingway-esque and all.

    This is a great topic for discussion, but here, it's OT and overrunning Rhino Ryan's Happy Birthday thread.
    A win to the Mojave.

  14. #74
    February 2:

    Howard Hall (1885-1940)

    Hall drove in the 1909 race at San Francisco and finished 14th and the 1911 Indianapolis 500, where he finished 17th. Here he sits in his car on the left on an unknown date:



    Ira Hall (1892-1987)

    Hall started seven races between 1928 and 1939. His best finish was a 7th at the 1932 500. He was later elected sheriff of Vigo County, Indiana. Here he is after qualifying in 1932:



    Elmer T. Shannon (1892-1961)

    Shannon's only race was the 1919 500, where he finished 13th. Here he is after qualifying (it's the best picture that I could find):



    Raul Riganti (1893-1970)

    Riganti served as a mentor to Juan Manuel Fangio and was one of Argentina's top drivers. His only Indy car races were the Indianapolis 500 in 1923, 1933 and 1940. His best finish was a 14th in 1933. Here he is after qualifying in 1923, where he finished 22nd:



    Delmar Desch (1920-1981)

    Desch competed at Pikes Peak from 1947 to 1951 and his best finish was a 7th in 1947. No picture is available.

    George Tichenor (1920-1998)

    Tichenor was a midget driver who attempted, but failed, to qualify for eight races from 1952 to 1955. Here he sits in a sprint car at Logansport in 1949:



    Billie Harvey (1950-2007)

    Harvey was an ARCA and occasional NASCAR driver. His only Indy car race was at Milwaukee in 1980, where he finished 19th. He was twice charged with marijuana trafficking in 1977 and 1982. In 1977, he was found guilty, but appealed, and it is unknown how his other trial went. However, he largely disappeared from racing around this time. Here he is at Milwaukee in number 97, getting lapped by Gordon Johncock:



    Billy Boat (51)

    Boat was a USAC driver who began to compete in the IRL in 1996. He appeared to have won at Texas in 1997, but it was determined that Arie Luyendyk was really the winner due to a scoring error during one of Luyendyk's pit stops. Boat would win at Texas the following year for his only IndyCar win. That same year, Boat won six pole positions in 11 races (he missed two races due to injury and another was lined up on point standings). Boat has the distinction of being the fastest qualifier for the 500 in 1998 and the slowest qualifier in 2001 and 2002. Here he is celebrating his 500 pole position:

    Last edited by Rhino Ryan; 02-03-2017 at 11:07 PM.

  15. #75
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    It wasn't actually Carlos Munoz' birthday.

    His is actually January 2nd.

  16. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    George Tichenor (1920-1998)

    Tichenor was a midget driver who attempted, but failed, to qualify for eight races from 1952 to 1955. Here he sits in a midget at Logansport in 1949:

    Midget???

  17. #77
    Quote Originally Posted by lotuspoweredbyford View Post
    It wasn't actually Carlos Munoz' birthday.

    His is actually January 2nd.
    I'm just going by what ChampCarStats says:

    http://www.champcarstats.com/drivers/MunozCarlos.htm

  18. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    I'm just going by what ChampCarStats says:

    http://www.champcarstats.com/drivers/MunozCarlos.htm
    I'm just going by what Carlos Munoz says. My guess is he would know.

    https://twitter.com/CarlosMunoz034/s...68623223517184
    Last edited by lotuspoweredbyford; 02-03-2017 at 10:00 AM.

  19. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by lotuspoweredbyford View Post
    I'm just going by what Carlos Munoz says. My guess is he would know.

    https://twitter.com/CarlosMunoz034/s...68623223517184
    Strange, ChampCarStats is usually pretty accurate when it comes to birth dates. It seems that I wasn't the only one to make this mistake.

  20. #80
    February 3:

    Ben Shoaff (1897-1960)

    Shoaff qualified for the Indianapolis 500 in 1927, finishing 13th, and 1928, finishing 26th. No picture is available.

    Harry Hunt (1901-1954)

    Hunt also only started two races, at Springfield in 1934 and 1935, finishing 7th and 12th. Here he is during practice for the 1935 500, where he failed to qualify due to engine problems:



    Bennie Benefiel (1904-1979)

    Benefiel entered the 1932 Indianapolis 500. However, he crashed in practice and riding mechanic Harry Cox was killed. No picture is available.

    Milt Marion (1909-1999)

    Marion was a New York sprint car driver who attempted 11 Indy car races between 1931 and 1937, but only qualified for three races. His best finish was a 7th in his first start at Springfield in 1935. His best known racing accomplishment was in 1936 when he won the first stock car race at Daytona Beach, at the time sanctioned by AAA. Here he is after winning at Daytona:



    Roscoe Rann (1917-1976)

    Rann was a sprint car and midget driver. His only Indy car appearance was at the 1951 500, where he failed to qualify. Here he is after winning a midget race:



    Johnny Moorhouse (1922-1999)

    Moorhouse was a midget driver who attempted, but failed, to qualify at Indianapolis and Phoenix in 1959. He was also replaced by Johnnie Tolan at Sacramento. Here are various pictures from his career:



    Lennie Waldo (73)

    Waldo was primarily a USAC Sprint Car-winning driver. He also drove stock cars in USAC, NASCAR, ASA and ARCA. His Indy car career consisted of being entered at the 1981 Pocono 500 in his USAC Silver Crown car, where he did not appear and failing to qualify for a USAC Gold Crown race at Springfield. Here he is in a sprint car race at Winchester in 1980 in number 92:



    Rocky Moran (67)

    Moran drove in Indy cars off-and-on between 1981 and 1994 and started 24 races. He nearly won in his debut at Watkins Glen in 1981 when he ran out of fuel while leading with five laps to go after leading 21 of 60 laps. He would later win the 1993 24 Hours of Daytona. Here he is after qualifying for the 1988 Indianapolis 500, where he finished 16th:



    Chico Serra (60)

    After being the 1979 British Formula Three champion, Serra competed in Formula One for three years and got a best finish of 6th at the 1982 Belgian Grand Prix. His only Indy car race was at Portland in 1985, where he started 26th and finished 25th. Here he is at that race:

    Last edited by Rhino Ryan; 03-19-2017 at 08:52 PM.

  21. #81
    February 4:

    Wally Butler (1898-unknown)

    Butler's Indy car career consisted of being ruled ineligible to compete at Beverly Hills in 1923 and qualifying too late for the 1924 Indianapolis 500. No picture is available.

    Van Johnson (1927-1959)

    Johnson failed to qualify for 10 of his first 15 races and he finished no better than 10th. However, at Langhorne in 1959, Johnson started 11th and went on to win the race. However, he would be killed just over a month later at an exhibition race at Williams Grove. Dick Linder was killed three months earlier in the car and Hugh Randall was killed in it three years later. Here he is at a sprint car race at Williams Grove in 1957:



    Bay Darnell (86)

    Darnell was primarily a USAC Stock Car driver, although he also competed in the NASCAR Cup Series and the ASA National Tour. He won four USAC Stock Car races and finished 2nd in the 1979 standings. His Indy car career consisted of qualifying for three races out of eight attempts. His best finish was a 9th in his debut at DuQuoin in 1965. Here he is before the 1974 USAC Stock Car race at the Indiana State Fairgrounds, which he would go on to win, his first win in the series:

    Last edited by Rhino Ryan; 02-05-2017 at 07:34 PM.

  22. #82
    Post deleted, not within the spirit and intention of this thread
    Last edited by Indyote; 02-04-2017 at 04:04 AM. Reason: not dealing with the main topic of the thread, should post this elsewhere.

  23. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    February 4:
    Van Johnson (1927-1959)

    Johnson failed to qualify for 10 of his first 15 races and he finished no better than 10th. However, at Langhorne in 1959, Johnson started 11th and went on to win the race. However, he would be killed just over a month later at an exhibition race at Williams Grove. Dick Linder was killed three months earlier in the car and Hugh Randall was killed in it three years later. Here he is at an exhibition race at Williams Grove in 1958, where he finished 10th:

    Wrong year, and wrong finishing position. That's a 1956 or '57 picture, and every time Johnson drove that car at Williams Grove he won. But tell me, what is an "exhibiton race"? You used that expression before.

  24. #84
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    It was a non points race. (exhibition)

    That is a sprint car that was owned by Sam Traylor of Allentown. He owned 3 sprint cars for a number of years.
    "Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved
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    "...holy $^!+...what a ride!"
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  25. #85
    Quote Originally Posted by Niseguy View Post
    It was a non points race. (exhibition).
    Ah so, but then it wasn't an exhibition race. Nor was the 1940 Langhorne race mentioned earlier (Ulesky), they were all points races for the Eastern Circuit Championship.

  26. #86
    Mistakes notwithstanding (and it's right that they should be picked up on and corrected), it must also be said that this thread is a very enjoyable and fine effort overall.

  27. #87
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Ferner View Post
    Ah so, but then it wasn't an exhibition race. Nor was the 1940 Langhorne race mentioned earlier (Ulesky), they were all points races for the Eastern Circuit Championship.
    They didn't count as points towards the AAA or USAC National Championships.

  28. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Ferner View Post
    Wrong year, and wrong finishing position. That's a 1956 or '57 picture, and every time Johnson drove that car at Williams Grove he won.
    You're right that it is actually from 1957. However, he finished 13th in that race.

    http://www.champcarstats.com/drivers/JohnsonVan.htm

  29. #89
    February 5:

    Louis Wagner (1882-1960)

    Wagner was an early Grand Prix driver who won both the first United States Grand Prix (1908) and the first British Grand Prix (1926). His Indy car career consisted of finishing 9th at Savannah in 1911 and 27th at the 1919 Indianapolis 500. Here he sits in his car prior to his only 500:



    Teddy Tetzlaff (1883-1929)

    In 20 Indy car starts, Tetzlaff finished in the top 10 12 times, including three wins. In 1914, Tezlaff set the world land speed record at the Bonneville Salt Flats at a speed of 142,8 mph. During and after his racing career, Tetzlaff appeared in silent movies, often playing a driver or himself. Here he sits in his car prior to the 1911 Indianapolis 500, where he finished 39th due to a crash after 20 laps:



    Bob McDonogh (1899-1945)

    McDonogh started 38 races between 1924 and 1932 and won two races at Altoona and Laurel. He he poses with his car following the first race at Laurel in 1925, where he finished 2nd:



    Hector Rebaque (61)

    Rebaque was at first a Formula One driver who for a time owned, and briefly built, his own cars. He switched to Indy cars in 1982 and in his first six races, he finished no better than 13th at Atlanta and Indianapolis. However, at Road America, Al Unser, Sr. ran out of fuel on the last lap and Rebaque passed him for the win. It was the only lap he led in an Indy car as he was injured in a testing crash at Milwaukee a week later and largely retired from racing. Here he is after qualifying at Indianapolis:



    Tom Phillips (59)

    Phillips' only race was in 1986 at Laguna Seca, where he finished 24th. Here he is in an SCCA endurance race in 1986 at an unknown track:

    https://photos.smugmug.com/Cars/LONG...2%20(2)-X2.jpg

  30. #90
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino Ryan View Post
    You're right that it is actually from 1957. However, he finished 13th in that race.

    http://www.champcarstats.com/drivers/JohnsonVan.htm
    Er, no. Wrong car, wrong race. Perhaps you should try to take in constructive criticism, instead of relying one one single internet source for research.

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman J Crump View Post
    Mistakes notwithstanding (and it's right that they should be picked up on and corrected), it must also be said that this thread is a very enjoyable and fine effort overall.
    I agree with you, but the mistakes should also be corrected in the original posts. I can see that the Fireball Roberts and Bob Allen nonsense is still there, for example - with time, it becomes alternative reality.

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