Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Turning a Minor Note into a Major Chord

  1. #1
    ...and proud of it. comfortably numb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Getting Lost in the Golden Years
    Posts
    33,598
    Blog Entries
    2

    Turning a Minor Note into a Major Chord

    It all started a number of weeks ago when it became apparent that I had to go into the shop for a little minor repair. Apparently some of the rubber bands had broken and the chewing gum had hardened, so the doctor said to meet him in couple weeks. But in the meantime---ya gotta have a physical boy. Whosyer G.P.?

    Well, I don't have one. The one of record retired and I never get sick---of course I never go in for checkups either. I mean I'm still a young man in his forties... Uh, fifties... Uh.... Holy Moly.

    OK... So the Doc's crack staff assign me a GP and I go see him. The kid looks all of 25. We check off all the stuff I don't do---which is everything. So he listens to what he has to listen to orders up a blood panel which I know will rat me out on my cholesteral level and an EKG. Great. We're done. let's go home. Later that day I get a call from his office. He did not like what he saw on the EKG, so he has ordered up an ECG and a Stress Test. Frankly, I found all tests stressful. So 3-3-17 I go down to get this done. But the orders were written wrong so they cannot due the Stress Test, but we will do the ECG.

    The ECG involves a very nice woman who lubricates warmly, fortunately, this enormous vibrator like object and proceeds to stick in into my chest with one hand while whe manipulates her keyboard with the other. On the screen I see some sort of orifice which, to me, seems to have a good beat and is fun to dance to. I ask where she went to college to learn such skills, and the answer is a community college in Orange County. I'm good with that. I can't do it.

    Now, when someone says they want more information about your heart, it follows that YOU probably want more information about your heart as well. But I was assured (if that is the right word) that I would not hear anything until Monday the 6th. So I follow up the following Monday, and no the results from the ECG are not in, but we have ordered the Stress Test. So I call the clinic and they report that NO they have not received the corrected orders for the stress test... This continues through the rest of the week. Patiently waiting I contact the clinic again and tell the lovely ladies there, HEY!!!!! I am supposed to have surgery on the 20th! And I am not cleared yet! The office of the pubescent GP say they have done it---the clinic says they have not.

    Finally, someone at the clinic takes the horns by the bull and orders the test for me for 3-16-17.

    So, I make my appointment, and after 4.5 hours I have been injected with isotopes, photographed for 7 minutes, sent upstairs where my manly chest was shaved, alcohol applied then dried and then spent another 15 minutes feeding information into I don't who knows what while a crowd of 5 staffers looked on before going back down to the lab for 15 more minutes of isotope photos....

    And after all this...

    And a glass of Bushmills...

    I still do not know what the pre-pubescent doctor saw on the EKG...
    My fear---and grace--- is that it was nothing...
    I still do not know what was seen on the ECG with the palapatating orifice...
    I still do not know if I am cleared to have the rubber bands and chewing gum replaced...

    I just know...
    I am tired of the pain...
    Though it does not compare with others (and we know of whom I am talking TTE)
    So if all goes well, I will see you all around next Friday...
    “Twitter is the spit on the sidewalk of life.” ~~numb
    "Passive aggressive BS. You aren't interested in learning anything from what I have to say. "

  2. #2
    Paradoxically Sublime Fool Turn13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Learning to drive in the rain in Brownsburg, Indiana
    Posts
    34,491
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by comfortably numb View Post
    I still do not know what was seen on the ECG with the palapatating orifice...
    I still do not know if I am cleared to have the rubber bands and chewing gum replaced...
    Well darn it. Did you ask?

    I know from experience, even if they tell you what it is, they will never ever ever be able to tell you what it costs to fix it, actually.

    Fun read, though thanks Well, fun for me Looking forward to the updates.

    My son and I both have the same GP. My wife's is in the same office. Twice I have had to schedule with the wife's. I sometimes wonder if I am the subject of humiliating anecdotes during everyone else's visits... they certainly aren't in mine. But then, they're normal people.
    "Each day well lived makes every yesterday a dream of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope. Look well therefore to this one day for it, and it alone, is life"
    ~ Sanskrit poem attributed to Kalidasa, "Salutation to the Dawn"


    Brian's Wish

  3. #3
    Insider Frank Capua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Wearin' my Vans down by the River...
    Posts
    47,731
    I got a new doctor three years ago and he's a she... an awfully good looking she at that. So the only time I have problems with my blood pressure anymore is when it's time for my yearly prostate exam.

    "Ride the Barrel and get pitted... So Pitted."



  4. #4
    Insider
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    5,784
    C'mon numb, tell us about the stress test. Figure if you survived that you can't be too bad off.

  5. #5
    ...and proud of it. comfortably numb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Getting Lost in the Golden Years
    Posts
    33,598
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Sleepcheap View Post
    C'mon numb, tell us about the stress test. Figure if you survived that you can't be too bad off.
    I figured it would involve a treadmill and walking.

    Nope.

    They inject magic syrup into your vein to fool your heart into thinking you are working out and then monitor its response.
    The toughest part was having Javier shave parts of by chest, washing with alcohol then drying it by fanning me with a manila folder.

    Then I sat there while Javier, tho nurses and a nursing student discussed the lines on the screen after they hooked me up to ten terminals.

    I have learned that I have an abnormality that is considered normal.

    No surprise there...

    But the big photo taking unit which revolved around my body for ten minutes was something else.
    The label on it read Dectector 1

  6. #6
    Moderator DannyB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Columbus, IN
    Posts
    14,708
    If the nurses are hot, perhaps it will be worth it.

    Truly hope it's nothing more than a minor adjustment, just a couple of turns on the wedge, etc.

  7. #7
    Insider
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    5,784
    Quote Originally Posted by comfortably numb View Post
    I figured it would involve a treadmill and walking.

    Nope.

    They inject magic syrup into your vein to fool your heart into thinking you are working out and then monitor its response.
    The toughest part was having Javier shave parts of by chest, washing with alcohol then drying it by fanning me with a manila folder.

    Then I sat there while Javier, tho nurses and a nursing student discussed the lines on the screen after they hooked me up to ten terminals.

    I have learned that I have an abnormality that is considered normal.

    No surprise there...

    But the big photo taking unit which revolved around my body for ten minutes was something else.
    The label on it read Dectector 1
    I feel cheated. I had to do the treadmill - twice. I told the cardiologist, "I can't believe you do this to old people."

  8. #8
    ...and proud of it. comfortably numb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Getting Lost in the Golden Years
    Posts
    33,598
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by DannyB View Post
    If the nurses are hot, perhaps it will be worth it.

    Truly hope it's nothing more than a minor adjustment, just a couple of turns on the wedge, etc.
    I will be spending three nights in luxury, and suspect I will not care what the nurses look like.

  9. #9
    Insider
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,942
    Quote Originally Posted by comfortably numb View Post
    I will be spending three nights in luxury, and suspect I will not care what the nurses look like.
    Good luck. Enjoy the luxury.
    Eff LBD!

  10. #10
    GIMME A SWORD Jamski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Buddhist Republic of Breezy Knoll
    Posts
    17,208
    Blog Entries
    2
    I had that magic syrup used on me once. Damned near killed me. Set my arrhythmia off big time. Wasn't as if I hadn't tried to warn them. To be fair, they did pay to have me shocked back into NSR, but I never went back there again.
    "And our credo: 'Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc: We gladly feast on those who would subdue us.' Not just pretty words."

    TrackForum Pick 5 International Sweepstakes Point Standings

    Brian's Wish * Jason Foundation

  11. #11
    ...and proud of it. comfortably numb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Getting Lost in the Golden Years
    Posts
    33,598
    Blog Entries
    2
    Back home and alive.

    The even better news is that due to Medicare rules, they require you to drive 40 miles to a city of 78,000 to pick up a walker instead of using a company in this city of 300.000.
    Brilliant simply brilliant.

  12. #12
    Insider Jim Wilke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Alaska. I thought I mentioned that.
    Posts
    64,936
    Blog Entries
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Sleepcheap View Post
    C'mon numb, tell us about the stress test. Figure if you survived that you can't be too bad off.
    I have a buddy whose dad was having some discomfort so his doc ordered a stress test. About 12 minutes into the 20 minute treadmill run, he had a heart attack and was dead when he hit the floor. My friend got a sizable insurance settlement and went down South and got a Busch ride. He was let go when the money ran out but his mechanic stayed and got a job, worked his way up. Mark Cronquist is still head engine builder for Joe Gibbs.

  13. #13
    Paradoxically Sublime Fool Turn13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Learning to drive in the rain in Brownsburg, Indiana
    Posts
    34,491
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Wilke View Post
    I have a buddy whose dad was having some discomfort so his doc ordered a stress test. About 12 minutes into the 20 minute treadmill run, he had a heart attack and was dead when he hit the floor. My friend got a sizable insurance settlement and went down South and got a Busch ride. He was let go when the money ran out but his mechanic stayed and got a job, worked his way up. Mark Cronquist is still head engine builder for Joe Gibbs.
    Sounds like one of the more viable methods for funding a motorsports career that we've seen here. I'm an older guy, not very healthy, but eager to help and would just love to run a treadmill to death for a good cause. I'll need a percentage upfront, though, and right of refusal on the attorney.

    I do have standards, after all. Just not a lot of health or willpower.

  14. #14
    Insider
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Newfoundland, Canada
    Posts
    6,208
    Quote Originally Posted by comfortably numb View Post
    Back home and alive.

    The even better news is that due to Medicare rules, they require you to drive 40 miles to a city of 78,000 to pick up a walker instead of using a company in this city of 300.000.
    Brilliant simply brilliant.
    Good that you're back home and possibly even better that you're alive.

    Sounds like the Medicare requirement of travelling 40 miles to pick up a walker may simply be part of a subtle, after-treatment, mini stress test.

  15. #15
    ...and proud of it. comfortably numb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Getting Lost in the Golden Years
    Posts
    33,598
    Blog Entries
    2
    One week after surgery and I got to meet my physical therapist who actually lives about four blocks from me. This is cool because we were able to tell him to stop in on his way home for work. He has given me a menu of movements to make in order to get me back to work in time to retire.

    But the whole pre-op testing thing is still sticking in my craw. The Medical Center said things were not done as they should. I was cleared for surgery so there could not have been anything seriously wrong. But the idea of having three tests done and not being told anything---general or specific---about the results has made me angry through the whole process.

    I am wondering if I should just let it go? Or should I file some sort of complaint just to make this doctor explain his shortcomings to some sort of authority?

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •