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Thread: Winfield on ReAmericanization

  1. #3691
    Quote Originally Posted by KenK View Post
    I think it is safe to say that she is your most important contact at this time.
    It's not just NASCAR...

    In any event, I don't think NASCAR's problems are technology based.
    Putting the quantum engine into NASCAR would be like adding nitrous to a poorly running engine.
    You'd get a power boost, but you'd still have the same underlying malfunctions.
    I agree Ken, the new generation of chemists and physicists have been taught quantum mechanics as their basis, my technology makes complete sense to them. Alternatively, chemists and physicists trained in Classical chemistry don't understand it. It's like converting a rotary dial phone user to an I Phone X, seniors often aren't comfortable using technology they don't understand. However, As DIA says, it would be tragic to see this development lost on the community it was designed to rescue, and catapult to new heights of relevance and popularity.

    I would personally feel vindicated if the Indy 500 were once again recognized as the global leader in technology, ahead of F-1, light years ahead of NASCAR. It seems the IMS has somehow lost confidence in itself, the confidence to lead, to innovate, to showcase American technology. The coasts have no problem trumpeting their own elitism, looking down on middle America as reprehensible, deplorable, you've heard all their negative representations of both the South and the Rust Belt, NASCAR and IndyCar country respectively. Now suddenly one of that demographic re-invents the world through technology? Might be too much for them to take. Beaten to the quantum punch by someone who frequents Wal-Wart, owns a pick-up truck, and goes to church.

    Globalists' heads might spin. But in order for the Rust Belt and the South to regain their mojo, the people in position to make it happen have to step up to the plate and deliver. The coasts are famous for investing in their own, that's why they harbor such vast wealth, they invest in tech and pharma, and they make billions. California, NY, and Massachusetts are brimming with entrepreneurs and venture capitalists, new innovative businesses spring up every day. In rust belt mentality, that doesn't often happen. There's nothing special in the water on the coasts that makes people there smarter, elitism is a state of mind, not a physical reality. My quantum technology is every bit as sophisticated as that coming out of Stanford or MIT, perhaps more so.

    But the rust belt needs to regain their confidence, and start funding world leading new technologies. I watched a video last night on the invention of the original 1939 GM Hydramatic transmission, a multi-part series by a Dr. Kelly at Weber State U, that was an incredible unit for it's time, just a light year ahead of any other such power transmission in the pre-WWII era. It was invented and manufactured right in Detroit. I can imagine that people had a hard time understanding how it worked as well, since the original Hydramatic has a very unusual power path to achieve it's four forward speeds and reverse, including alternating between a 1:1 and a 1:4:1 input speed to the back half of the gearset by virtue of three nesting shafts and multiple planetary gearsets and their clutches and bands. Your typical engineer today would still marvel at this design sophistication, and the fact they were mass producible for $150 apiece in 1940.

  2. #3692
    Registered User turbopanzer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winfield View Post
    I agree Ken, the new generation of chemists and physicists have been taught quantum mechanics as their basis, my technology makes complete sense to them. Alternatively, chemists and physicists trained in Classical chemistry don't understand it. It's like converting a rotary dial phone user to an I Phone X, seniors often aren't comfortable using technology they don't understand. However, As DIA says, it would be tragic to see this development lost on the community it was designed to rescue, and catapult to new heights of relevance and popularity.

    I would personally feel vindicated if the Indy 500 were once again recognized as the global leader in technology, ahead of F-1, light years ahead of NASCAR. It seems the IMS has somehow lost confidence in itself, the confidence to lead, to innovate, to showcase American technology. The coasts have no problem trumpeting their own elitism, looking down on middle America as reprehensible, deplorable, you've heard all their negative representations of both the South and the Rust Belt, NASCAR and IndyCar country respectively. Now suddenly one of that demographic re-invents the world through technology? Might be too much for them to take. Beaten to the quantum punch by someone who frequents Wal-Wart, owns a pick-up truck, and goes to church.

    Globalists' heads might spin. But in order for the Rust Belt and the South to regain their mojo, the people in position to make it happen have to step up to the plate and deliver. The coasts are famous for investing in their own, that's why they harbor such vast wealth, they invest in tech and pharma, and they make billions. California, NY, and Massachusetts are brimming with entrepreneurs and venture capitalists, new innovative businesses spring up every day. In rust belt mentality, that doesn't often happen. There's nothing special in the water on the coasts that makes people there smarter, elitism is a state of mind, not a physical reality. My quantum technology is every bit as sophisticated as that coming out of Stanford or MIT, perhaps more so.

    But the rust belt needs to regain their confidence, and start funding world leading new technologies. I watched a video last night on the invention of the original 1939 GM Hydramatic transmission, a multi-part series by a Dr. Kelly at Weber State U, that was an incredible unit for it's time, just a light year ahead of any other such power transmission in the pre-WWII era. It was invented and manufactured right in Detroit. I can imagine that people had a hard time understanding how it worked as well, since the original Hydramatic has a very unusual power path to achieve it's four forward speeds and reverse, including alternating between a 1:1 and a 1:4:1 input speed to the back half of the gearset by virtue of three nesting shafts and multiple planetary gearsets and their clutches and bands. Your typical engineer today would still marvel at this design sophistication, and the fact they were mass producible for $150 apiece in 1940.
    For what reason should the rust belt invest? The current tax structure supports manufacturing overseas and puts greater emphasis on the robotic and artificial intelligence aspect of production. The only value to this type of investment is over the lomg term. Think the automobile industry or the steel industry will be around in 30 to 50 years? Think again. The current trend is toward composite materials and renewable resources. You know...that "seaweed technology" thingy! Please offer your thoughts to the questions presented.
    "Lead,follow or get the hell out of the way!

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  3. #3693
    Quote Originally Posted by turbopanzer View Post
    For what reason should the rust belt invest? The current tax structure supports manufacturing overseas and puts greater emphasis on the robotic and artificial intelligence aspect of production. The only value to this type of investment is over the lomg term. Think the automobile industry or the steel industry will be around in 30 to 50 years? Think again. The current trend is toward composite materials and renewable resources. You know...that "seaweed technology" thingy! Please offer your thoughts to the questions presented.


    Panzer, you hit it out of the park with that question. Here, read this link:

    https://www.biopharmadive.com/news/california-masschusetts-biotech-hub-venture--capital-employment/512086/

    These two states are bragging about how much they invest in new chemistry (chemistry is the basis of Pharma), billions of dollars into new R&D. Why would they do this? Ask yourself why they would do this, and you will understand why the rust belt is failing, fading into obscurity. Yes, the American worker in blue collar jobs is expensive versus his or her counterpart in the offshore locations, so the old line manufacturing community is leaving the USA, in fact it's already left. But my technology is not common manufacturing, it's chemistry (primarily) and advanced technology manufacturing (microwave technology / superalloy fabrication heat exchanger, ceramic technology coatings) these are high end, high skill jobs, not pressing the green button on a CNC machining center or watching robots spot welding.

    The rust belt is primed for this, people are far too skilled to be useful in today's robotic manufacturing environment. That's why they're underemployed, they invented and advanced the robots that eventually took their jobs. The rust belt is the perfect location for manufacturing a high technology product, and this product is as high technology as it gets. This market is projected at nearly 93.1 billion dollars by 2025 (Classical physics batteries), my energy storage instantly obsoletes the common battery, because quantum mechanics facilitates a new discharge equation. This is like the introduction of the superheterodyne circuit in place of the regenerative or TRF circuits of the 20's, RCA owned the patents on the super, and thus dominated the electronics industry in the middle of the 20th century. They went on to develop television and FM, that was a potent combination and RCA bought up (or took over by virtue of massive capital) all those rights (from inventors Farnsworth and Armstrong).

    Quantum chemistry is just getting underway, as I said the female PhD chemist I met had been educated using quantum mechanics as her chemistry theory basis, not classical chemistry, which has been disproven. The old 2-8-8 shell has been totally upgraded to the energy level orbital model of quantum mechanics. The battery is Classical, my energy storage is quantum. It will come to redefine the 21st century electrification efforts, it's simply a matter of time and resources. I don't live on the coasts, not am I an elitist in philosophy, I love Indiana and the Midwest, I was raised in Chicago and live in Indianapolis since coming here to race Indycars. The rust belt is just waiting to explode into new economic activity, and can be the hub of quantum based technologies, industrial chemistry, energy storage technology, storage of solar and wind energy, the next major economic engine of the USA.

  4. #3694
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winfield View Post


    Panzer, you hit it out of the park with that question. Here, read this link:

    https://www.biopharmadive.com/news/california-masschusetts-biotech-hub-venture--capital-employment/512086/

    These two states are bragging about how much they invest in new chemistry (chemistry is the basis of Pharma), billions of dollars into new R&D. Why would they do this? Ask yourself why they would do this, and you will understand why the rust belt is failing, fading into obscurity. Yes, the American worker in blue collar jobs is expensive versus his or her counterpart in the offshore locations, so the old line manufacturing community is leaving the USA, in fact it's already left. But my technology is not common manufacturing, it's chemistry (primarily) and advanced technology manufacturing (microwave technology / superalloy fabrication heat exchanger, ceramic technology coatings) these are high end, high skill jobs, not pressing the green button on a CNC machining center or watching robots spot welding.

    The rust belt is primed for this, people are far too skilled to be useful in today's robotic manufacturing environment. That's why they're underemployed, they invented and advanced the robots that eventually took their jobs. The rust belt is the perfect location for manufacturing a high technology product, and this product is as high technology as it gets. This market is projected at nearly 93.1 billion dollars by 2025 (Classical physics batteries), my energy storage instantly obsoletes the common battery, because quantum mechanics facilitates a new discharge equation. This is like the introduction of the superheterodyne circuit in place of the regenerative or TRF circuits of the 20's, RCA owned the patents on the super, and thus dominated the electronics industry in the middle of the 20th century. They went on to develop television and FM, that was a potent combination and RCA bought up (or took over by virtue of massive capital) all those rights (from inventors Farnsworth and Armstrong).

    Quantum chemistry is just getting underway, as I said the female PhD chemist I met had been educated using quantum mechanics as her chemistry theory basis, not classical chemistry, which has been disproven. The old 2-8-8 shell has been totally upgraded to the energy level orbital model of quantum mechanics. The battery is Classical, my energy storage is quantum. It will come to redefine the 21st century electrification efforts, it's simply a matter of time and resources. I don't live on the coasts, not am I an elitist in philosophy, I love Indiana and the Midwest, I was raised in Chicago and live in Indianapolis since coming here to race Indycars. The rust belt is just waiting to explode into new economic activity, and can be the hub of quantum based technologies, industrial chemistry, energy storage technology, storage of solar and wind energy, the next major economic engine of the USA.
    And all of the above post is tossed in a cocked hat by your laser-like focus on the tiny fragment (dare I say quantum sized) of industry/society that is IndyCar racing (really not even IndyCar racing, but Indy 500). A total market of 100-200 quantum engines...

    By your own words, you would deny this most disruptive technology to all if the IndyCar PTB do not finance your efforts. So far all you've sold is the sizzle, no steak.
    BAN SHREDDED CHEESE! MAKE AMERICA GRATE AGAIN!

  5. #3695
    Registered User turbopanzer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jakester View Post
    And all of the above post is tossed in a cocked hat by your laser-like focus on the tiny fragment (dare I say quantum sized) of industry/society that is IndyCar racing (really not even IndyCar racing, but Indy 500). A total market of 100-200 quantum engines...

    By your own words, you would deny this most disruptive technology to all if the IndyCar PTB do not finance your efforts. So far all you've sold is the sizzle, no steak.
    100-200 engines? More like 50 to 75. As for the sizzle, not there either. One must consider all aspects of entering a new or emerging market. Based upon the information provided so far...it has a rather long way to go. You can not sell what others dfo not understand. Not to mention the downside ramifications of said product.

  6. #3696
    Quote Originally Posted by turbopanzer View Post
    100-200 engines? More like 50 to 75. As for the sizzle, not there either. One must consider all aspects of entering a new or emerging market. Based upon the information provided so far...it has a rather long way to go. You can not sell what others dfo not understand. Not to mention the downside ramifications of said product.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4XknGqr3Bo Here's something else few truly understand, it's almost an hour long but it's fascinating. It's the story of a revolutionary technology, beginning in 1948 in a laboratory, devised by three people, and which became Silicon Valley and the many trillion dollar IT industry. It began as a search for a tubeless telephone line amplifier. It became the greatest business case in history. Three wise men. It's quite remarkable as the narrator says the inventors were pioneers in quantum mechanics, understanding the electron (to a limited extent). Today, the quantum nature of semiconductors is much more thoroughly understood, today's Intel Corp is sort of the stepchild of Bill Shockley, one of the three Nobel prize winners from Bell labs back in Jersey.

    No one understood what those guys were doing, in fact they openly mocked an attempt to replace the highly developed vacuum tube with a solid state technology. But the three scientists succeeded, due to both brilliance and perseverance. And Silicon Valley exists today, sucking up a major percentage of the economy as profits to their expertise. The hour long video is amazing, from patent to financial empire, in the 20th century we all lived in.

    Now, Jakester wonders why I chose to temporarily fixate on IndyCar, well, it's right down the block from me, I spent twenty years of my life in the sport. It is the local economic engine, a billion dollar entity in a sea of rust belt obsolescence. If I had invented a particle beam weapons system, I would have taken it to DARPA, if I had patented a new OS I would have taken it to Silicon Valley. If I had devised a new quantum based processor algorithm, I would have taken it to Palo Alto, or Texas Instruments, or Seth Lloyd at MIT. But I invented a quantum based engine that doesn't burn fuel, so I took it to the IMS, the only business within thousands of miles that should supposedly desire to fund such a development. IMS to me was the Bell Labs of my generation, Herb Porter and Dick Jones perfecting the turbocharging of racing engines, Stu Hilborn perfecting a boost controlled fuel delivery system, Mallory perfecting a solid state transistor ignition system, Ilmor and HPD perfecting direct injection for race engines. In the era I raced, innovation was the order of the day, engines and aerodynamics. I contributed heavily to that era by my original invention of the third spring mechanism that could be applied to independently sprung wheels, in late 1991. It is and remains the last significant suspension innovation applied to IndyCars, all of them, beginning in 1993. I didn't patent it, so I lost out on millions of dollars. Tim Wardrop, our beloved Dr. Who, the still track record holding engineer who passed away a few years ago, used to laugh at my predicament, he said I should own my own island by now if I had just sent the drawing in for a Provisional along with $100. Instead I gave the drawing to Tom Brown, who used it at Penske's and re-invented the suspension system for ground effects cars. It was ultimately worth about 19 MPH at IMS, far more efficient than even Chapman's rear engine Lotus, which was only worth 5 MPH over a good Roadster.

  7. #3697
    Administratively Fooled DurwardKirby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winfield
    ...Tim Wardrop, our beloved Dr. Who, the still track record holding engineer who passed away a few years ago, used to laugh at my predicament...
    We knew him well:

    http://www.trackforum.com/forums/mem...r-(aka-239-26)
    There's really no such thing as Gary the Møøse, Sybil.

  8. #3698
    Quote Originally Posted by doitagain View Post
    Yep, I first worked with Tim at Machinist's Union racing around 1987, when he was a March engineer. He loved the drawing-on-a-bar napkin story (maybe because he later owned a bar in Indiana), and he relentlessly chided me for not patenting the third spring mechanism. Actually, I invented the third spring mechanism itself, Tom Brown applied it over the traditional springing mechanism, creating a third spring, I had envisioned it as a monoshock system that could receive two different rate inputs, unlike the F-1 monoshock which was rigid, and useless on ovals.

    If you ever have questions or doubts about the validity of my claims, ask Paul Diatlovich, (PDM racing) he was an eye-witness to my passing the drawing to Brown (in a bar in Phoenix) with my explanation of how it worked, while Paul is still alive and kicking. I'm not convinced you fully believe series of events. While many people know the story, having heard it from Paul or myself, or seeing the copies of the drawings I made, those witnesses are dying off, we unfortunately lost another one last year.

  9. #3699
    Administratively Fooled DurwardKirby's Avatar
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    I don't doubt your claims (or should I say, your earnestness), I just don't understand what they are, and what you are asking for to realize them.

    My dad was a clever engineer, too, always working around the edges of fascinating innovations for practical application, but he never got beyond a few patents applied for.

    I myself knew that lasers and CAD would combine to revolutionize surveying, civil engineering and architecture thirty years before it happened, but even with a million dollars advance in 1989 am I confident I'd have beaten the players to the market with any positive return.

  10. #3700
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    The rust belt is primed for this, people are far too skilled to be useful in today's robotic manufacturing environment. That's why they're underemployed, they invented and advanced the robots that eventually took their jobs. The rust belt is the perfect location for manufacturing a high technology product, and this product is as high technology as it gets. This market is projected at nearly 93.1 billion dollars by 2025 (Classical physics batteries), my energy storage instantly obsoletes the common battery, because quantum mechanics facilitates a new discharge equation. This is like the introduction of the superheterodyne circuit in place of the regenerative or TRF circuits of the 20's, RCA owned the patents on the super, and thus dominated the electronics industry in the middle of the 20th century. They went on to develop television and FM, that was a potent combination and RCA bought up (or took over by virtue of massive capital) all those rights (from inventors Farnsworth and Armstrong)
    .


    Now, Jakester wonders why I chose to temporarily fixate on IndyCar, well, it's right down the block from me, I spent twenty years of my life in the sport. It is the local economic engine, a billion dollar entity in a sea of rust belt obsolescence. If I had invented a particle beam weapons system, I would have taken it to DARPA, if I had patented a new OS I would have taken it to Silicon Valley. If I had devised a new quantum based processor algorithm, I would have taken it to Palo Alto, or Texas Instruments, or Seth Lloyd at MIT. But I invented a quantum based engine that doesn't burn fuel, so I took it to the IMS, the only business within thousands of miles that should supposedly desire to fund such a development. IMS to me was the Bell Labs of my generation,
    Fine, you picked Indy., a "billion dollar entity". If that's your choice, then stop trying to justify your engine by citing "93 billion dollar" markets.

    I suspect a 'quantum based engine that doesn't burn fuel' would likely be of interest to far more businesses than just IMS, even given a thousand mile limitation.
    Last time I checked, Detroit is less than 'thousands of miles' from your location...heck even Toyota North American headquarters are only about 900 miles away.

    BTW considering the Indy Colts produced about $373MM in revenue in 2017, I think the idea of IMS being a 'billion dollar entity' might be stretching a bit (maybe if one includes all of the families business revenue).

  11. #3701
    Registered User turbopanzer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jakester View Post
    .




    Fine, you picked Indy., a "billion dollar entity". If that's your choice, then stop trying to justify your engine by citing "93 billion dollar" markets.

    I suspect a 'quantum based engine that doesn't burn fuel' would likely be of interest to far more businesses than just IMS, even given a thousand mile limitation.
    Last time I checked, Detroit is less than 'thousands of miles' from your location...heck even Toyota North American headquarters are only about 900 miles away.

    BTW considering the Indy Colts produced about $373MM in revenue in 2017, I think the idea of IMS being a 'billion dollar entity' might be stretching a bit (maybe if one includes all of the families business revenue).
    And we agree on something. I think there are many transportation industries that would love to have this product. Automobile racing is an entertainment market. One should focus on something rather substantial than waste one's time on a trivial market such as "contrived parity lawn mower racing"!

  12. #3702
    Waiting for the next race KenK's Avatar
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    The current tax structure supports manufacturing overseas
    Then call your congressweasel.

    Think the automobile industry or the steel industry will be around in 30 to 50 years? Think again. The current trend is toward composite materials and renewable resources.
    Are you suggesting we'll all be using mass/public transportation? Not practical for many people.

    How long will it be before we see composite material ships and railroad freight cars?

    Are all composite materials renewable or recyclable? Steel is certainly recyclable.
    "It is a besetting vice of democracies to substitute public opinion for law. This is the usual form in which masses of men exhibit their tyranny." - James Fenimore Cooper

    "One man with courage is a majority." - Thomas Jefferson

  13. #3703
    Registered User turbopanzer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenK View Post
    Then call your congressweasel.



    Are you suggesting we'll all be using mass/public transportation? Not practical for many people.

    How long will it be before we see composite material ships and railroad freight cars?

    Are all composite materials renewable or recyclable? Steel is certainly recyclable.
    Congressweasel? I love it !

    Mass transit...yes to big cities...no to small towns. But driverless vehicles..yes. Composite materials are on the way. Cost of production has dropped and as old equipment is replaced lighter and stronger products will take there place. Time frame..next 20 to 30 years. Even shipbulding is looking into it.

    https://www.compositesworld.com/colu...ll-fabrication

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    The engine would burn fuel. How do you think the salt gets hot. It would use a massive amount of energy for a full field of racecars.

  15. #3705
    Quote Originally Posted by doitagain View Post
    I don't doubt your claims (or should I say, your earnestness), I just don't understand what they are, and what you are asking for to realize them.

    My dad was a clever engineer, too, always working around the edges of fascinating innovations for practical application, but he never got beyond a few patents applied for.

    I myself knew that lasers and CAD would combine to revolutionize surveying, civil engineering and architecture thirty years before it happened, but even with a million dollars advance in 1989 am I confident I'd have beaten the players to the market with any positive return.
    In this case, I beat the current "players" to the patent office, by a decade or more. They are trying to internalize what I accomplished, at least they are reading the patents and papers, and coming to understand what a quantum based energy storage process entails. It's not impossible to understand, once you fully understand that the electron orbits you were most likely taught as an undergrad are simply not reality, they are the Classical approximation of reality, the reality is the quantum mechanical understanding of the electron, it's orbitals and energy levels, and it's wave particle duality.

    Electrons are probabilities, not billiard balls. Once you collapse the wave function, then they can then act as billiard balls, left to their own device they act like waves, and form interference patterns in experiments. They exhibit Heisenberg Uncertainty (you cannot know position and momentum of an electron simultaneously) and demonstrate Pauli Exclusion (no two electrons of the same spin exist in an energy level). There are endless videos of quantum orbitals and energy levels online, I have posted dozens, the most recent ones I posted are very valuable. You have to understand the energy level orbital description of quantum mechanics in order to process how my invention works. Anyone who doesn't get it is still thinking Classically, Newtonian Physics, and that leads to wrong answers. Classical physics does not accurately describe nor represent the actual behavior of the electron, as understood today in the universally accepted form of the Standard Model of Physics.

    If you can get past that, and move beyond the Classical interpretation of the electron, then you can readily see how my system uses electrons in more than one quantum state. An electron quantum state is defined by a four number address, 1) principal 2) azimuthal 3) magnetic and 4) spin, like a four number house address. No two electrons in any atom share the same 4 number address. Electrons exist on floors (or steps), separated by one quanta, they cannot exist in between energy levels, they jump or drop energy levels based on receiving or transmitting photons. This is why my patent is so valuable, because for the first time, I am employing electrons in more than one energy level to perform work. My system is so sophisticated, it acts as both a methodology of heat exchange (via phonon lattice vibration) and as electrical current generator (reacting with a cathode, which exists like a charged hydraulic accumulator acting as an adjunct to a hydraulic system), in the case of the cathode the energy liberated is molecular bond energy, this allows the second order differential equation of discharge. Simple, right?

    If you're truly interested, I will offer to meet you for lunch at Dawsons', which is right in-between IMS and my shop. I can give you a document package, take you for a tour of my shop and to view the mock-up quantum engine, show you what I need external funding for (precisely, not vaguely) and share the identity of the female quantum educated PhD chemist I met at PRI, you can perhaps contact her through the energy company she is a researcher for, or Linked-In, if you need to find a consultant. Come and meet me, you say when it's convenient for you.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aoi4j8es4gQ

    Watch this 8 minute video first, it will change your life

  16. #3706
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    Sounds like fun, but I'm just a silicon-based program executing algorithms on a server in the bottom of an abandoned missile silo somewhere in Montana. Perhaps Gary the Møøse will be in touch . Just beware, I asked him to multiply volts times amperes and he just said watt?

  17. #3707
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    Quote Originally Posted by doitagain View Post
    Sounds like fun, but I'm just a silicon-based program executing algorithms on a server in the bottom of an abandoned missile silo somewhere in Montana. Perhaps Gary the Møøse will be in touch . Just beware, I asked him to multiply volts times amperes and he just said watt?
    Missle silo? Can i interest you in a couple of older, but in good condition ICBM's ? Low miles and great for strategic incisions into hostile territory's. I offer no money down and up to five years payment witj approved credit. Easy terms and you can have in two days. Great deals like this don't come every day so if you want to start WW3...think wisely and buy from the Panzer!

  18. #3708
    Hi Winfield. Nice to see you back.

    I wouldn’t put too much effort into proving your invention will work at least when you’re initially speaking with investors, especially those without the technical background to understand it anyway. They’ll grant your invention a non-zero chance of working based on what you’ve done so far and if they’re interested in proceeding they’ll get third-party validation during their due diligence phase. That probability is never 1 anyway with novel technology and who knows how much they’ll discount due to it being quantum based. But whatever probability they ascribe to it working is just a factor when determining the piece of your company they’ll ask for not whether or not they'll invest.

    I know the science aspect is the main interest for you, but what investors are looking for is how their return will materialize. For example, if $1M today is guaranteed to be worth $1B ten years from now, there are plenty of investors who would take the risk even if they gave your invention a mere 1% chance of working. That part is just a numbers game for them because if they make 100 similar investments and only 1 is worth $1B in 10 years, the CAGR of that fund pool is ~25%. That’s also the reason I wouldn’t expect too much from investors without at least access to those large investment pools—the risk of total loss is too high without diversification.

    So if you’re putting together a presentation, formal or otherwise, I’d make sure to give the “show me the money” return side of the equation a major emphasis, if not the major one. They’ll ascribe a probability to that as well and factor it into what piece of the pie they’ll ask for. In that regard I wouldn’t focus too much on the IndyCar angle, simply because the money you need to show them is in the hundreds of millions in revenue your invention will generate, and I think we can agree IndyCar won’t be the primary source of that revenue, if at all. It needn’t be super detailed and I’m sure you have a picture in your mind of how the world will look with your invention. So just paint the picture for them, briefly explain why your product will displace what’s out there and how you’ll go about it. Heck, you could flesh out that missing but vital ingredient right here if you want.

  19. #3709
    Thanks Sky, I'll take your advice to heart. Of course I am optomistic that my technology is considered to be more than simply an investment expecting a return, it's potentially as inspiring as the 1947 transistor from Bell Labs, a tiny device that no one understood with respect to the mature science and global manufacturing of vacuum tube based analog technology. Suddenly, the world changed from analog to digital, and the rest is financial history, the impact of the original transistor is incalcuable, Brattain, bardeen , and Shockley all won the Nobel Prize, one of Shockley's first employees after he moved home to CA (and started Silicon Valley) founded Intel, no one can predict the actual size and value of quantum based industry. But one can readily make the case for quantum based technology, it is the base physics taught to post -Millenials today at the most significant science and math based universities.

    Quantum based energy storage and release is the new base technology for storing and releasing enegy, either portable (like in fuel-less Semi Trucks) or power grid storage that stores and releases energy produced by wind, solar, and hydrodynamic sources. It is the theoretical foundation of compressor-less HVAC systems for homes and businesses. It is a fundamental technology, one which underpins all post-Classical (physics) based machinery. we know Classical physics has been superceded by quantum mechanics, just research any major university that features physics and chemistry, it's no longer just MIT and Stanford and IIT. It's everywhere. The patent universe in this field is just beginning to be understood, in a matter of a couple decades quantum chemistry, computing, and physics will come to utterly dominate the global economy, like the transistor did, as it morphed into the digital microprocessor, and now runs just about everything.

    If an investor were to perform due diligence, he or she would realize that quantum mechanics has completely overtaken Classical physics at every major institution. Quantum based pharmaceuticals are being designed as the quantum software becomes readily available to consumers, software like the latest versions of chemical bond and electron design software (called molecular dynamics). As soon as one recognizes that all chemistry and pharma are fully in the quantum camp, they will recognize the value of any fundamental quantum based patents, such as my own. My patent is a foundational one, it can be built upon for decades, and I am prepared to write dozens more in the field of quantum based industrial and chemical futures. People in science have come to understand the electron state at a level never even imagined by 20th century physics and chemistry. Anyone in the investment field should realize the potential for this, it rivals Silicon Valley as the next big deal. However, the hold up is that most investors were educated in the era of Classical Physics, and they haven;t internalized the wholesale switchover to quantum based technology, sure they have heard of the Higgs boson and CERN and the Standard Model, but they don't know what that means for chemistry and physics based manufacturable devices. Quantum technologies are the most impressive portfolio one can attain, ask any newly minted PhD in the hard sciences.

    My invention of using electrons in multiple quantum states simultaneously is the foundation of all energy storage and release equations in the future, as it facilitates quantum bootstrapping, feeding one output back into another's input, it is similar in concept to Armstrong regeneration, the first successful electronic amplification. Armstrong went on to develop the now universal superhetrodyne principal, and FM radio and TV sound. Once one gets past Hertz's discovery of electromagnetic waves, Armstrong and Bell Labs' transistor define the path to the world we now inhabit.
    Last edited by Winfield; 01-11-2019 at 01:07 PM.

  20. #3710
    Insider Jakester's Avatar
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    I'll admit to watching (and enjoying) Nova's Einstein's Quantum Riddle episode.
    https://www.thirteen.org/programs/no...riddle-ykvwhm/

  21. #3711
    Quote Originally Posted by Jakester View Post
    I'll admit to watching (and enjoying) Nova's Einstein's Quantum Riddle episode.
    https://www.thirteen.org/programs/no...riddle-ykvwhm/
    Yes, I caught the second half of it, informative as well as entertaining, kudos to Nova on its production.

    I'm sure now that you are digesting quantum mechanics as the underlying reality, you'll actually come to realize that achieving patents in the quantum realm is exceedingly rare, infinitesimally rare. It took me years and a 2" high stack of documents laboriously compiled to make my case to the patent examiner, who was certainly no fool. He was not about to sign off on some questionable scientific claims, (and potentially endanger his career) I had to make a bulletproof physics case, and I did. Quantum patents are the most rare and desirable imaginable, they form the basis for all technology to follow in the remainder of this century. Imagine yourself in Bell labs, observing that first transistor in action. Would you have visualized the potential? Or would you have scoffed at the revolutionary science and doubled down on your vacuum tube manufacturer investments? The quantum revolution will dwarf all before it.
    Actually having achieved such a patent was against staggering odds, this isn't something that patent office grants lightly by any means. My patent attorney, a former head of the USPTO, then in private practice, told me the patent examiner was incredibly impressed at the quality of my research, and he said : "you know your quantum mechanics". That's exceedingly rare praise from a patent examiner.

  22. #3712
    Quote Originally Posted by Winfield View Post

    Quantum based energy storage and release is the new base technology for storing and releasing enegy, either portable (like in fuel-less Semi Trucks) or power grid storage that stores and releases energy produced by wind, solar, and hydrodynamic sources.
    Not being argumentative but why? Why would businesses in those industries switch to quantum technology? What’s the main benefit?

  23. #3713
    Quote Originally Posted by skylane View Post
    Not being argumentative but why? Why would businesses in those industries switch to quantum technology? What’s the main benefit?


    I suspect that's the essential question, thanks Sky. The benefit is quantum understanding of energy storage enables a unique discharge equation, one which is extended via feedback from one electron quantum state's output to another electron quantum state's input, thus creating an entirely new second order differential equation of system discharge. It is similar to Faraday's discovery that electromagnetic energy was in reality a two-component combination of magnetic field and electric field (b field and e field), separated by phase. This knowledge allowed the science of electronics to blossom.

    In the micro world of the electron, we now know that electrons exist in quantized energy level orbitals, with only two electrons per orbital, each with opposite spin. These electron energy levels can be utilized for work in different ways, and recombined into systems that facilitate feedback or quantum bootstrapping. In my system, the electrons below the Fermi bandgap oscillate to transfer heat via phonon lattice vibration, most readily visualized by squeezing toothpaste from a tube, heat transfers through materials by vibrations called phonons.

    Alternatively, electrons above the Fermi bandgap carry electrical charge, this system is called ionic conductivity, and is facilitated by electrons above the Fermi bandgap known as free electrons, they can migrate from an electron rich anode towards an electron needy cathode. The migration of these electrons is called electrical current.

    The quantum system thus allows an electrical current to be back-fed into a microwave based heat source to facilitate the phonon lattice vibrations in the heat transfer operation. It is like a skyscraper with two factories on different floors, say 37th and 45th floor (with the Fermi bandgap in-between them). Quantum energy storage allows the output of the 45th floor to be routed to the input of the 37th floor factory, thus multiplying the output of the factories. Separating electrons into their energy levels, creating optimal conditions for those electrons to do work specific to those energy levels (heat transfer and electrical current production), and recombining those two energy streams allows the creation of the new discharge equation, elongated in time, but not in violation of energy conservation. Cathode bond energy, acting similar to a charged hydraulic accumulator abetting a hydraulic system, can be liberated in the electrical current production.

    Thus, a quantum system can be viewed as a two component energy stream (like the e field and b field of the electromagnetic energy discovered by Faraday, and described mathematically by Maxwell's laws. Only in the case of quantum system, the two components are A) phonon lattice vibrations and B) electrical current, which can then be bootstrapped together to elongate the discharge equation, along the second order differential equation of discharge.

    This quantum system doesn't create any energy, which is disallowed by first law (conservation), it splits the energy into sub-components, phonon lattice vibrations and electrical current flow via free electrons, and re-combines them advantageously, after the free electrons have liberated bond energy from a cathode (an accumulator). No Classical system can do this, because Classical systems do not recognize the individual energy levels of electrons, and thus they treat them all the same, using one or the other to produce work. Classical energy storage is like pre-Faraday electrical understanding, they could use voltage to light an arc lamp (Davy) or they could see a magnetic reaction of a compass held next to a wire carrying current, but until Maxwell described mathematically that both components existed at the same time, in a relationship defined by phase, they couldn't make use of the entirety of the energy available. A century and a half later, we can now take apart energy at the quantum level, separate the components, and re-combine into a new equation of discharge. This is the actual Discovery, separation and re-combination of a quantum two component energy stream. Here is Dr. inagaki's (Japan, the world's recognized expert in carbon) statement validating my research:

    "Thermal conduction in graphite is due to lattice vibration, phonon,
    in contrast to
    electrical conduction which is due to free electrons in metals"

    This is precisely what I described in the patents, a two component system based in the understanding of quantum mechanics. It allows an increase in time duration of discharge of an energy storage system based in quantum technology, without violating energy conservation. This is a fundamental Discovery, like Faraday's b field and e field.

    The bottom line is this, your electric car, with a Classical physics based lithium battery pack, might go 235 miles at 55 MPH before it goes dead and stops. My quantum battery can power a Semi-truck at 75,000 pounds, at 57 MPH, for 8 consecutive hours on a single charge. (Purdue produced algorithm by Fan / Shen), using only a 300 gallon tank of my Dirac liquid ( a lithium-potassium molten salt).
    Last edited by Winfield; 01-12-2019 at 09:14 AM.

  24. #3714
    Paradoxically Sublime Fool Turn13's Avatar
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    I wonder if the people investing in these 95-lb, $20,000 video cameras in the 1960's understood the science involved?

    http://www.earlytelevision.org/pdf/s...L_brochure.pdf
    Last edited by Turn13; 01-12-2019 at 10:59 AM.
    "Each day well lived makes every yesterday a dream of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope. Look well therefore to this one day for it, and it alone, is life"
    ~ Sanskrit poem attributed to Kalidasa, "Salutation to the Dawn"


    Brian's Wish

  25. #3715
    Probably not, only a recently graduated electrical engineer educated in solid state electronics in the 60's would have had any real concept of how it actually worked. How many people today actually understand how 1960's analog electronics worked? Perhaps a million in the USA, out of 330 million. I looked up the quantum mechanics vids on youtube to answer your question, to see how many people actually watch them, around 1 million is common, the best graphics vids like PBS produced stuff can get 7 million, the more detailed stuff averages less than half a million.
    Here's a 15 minute TEDx talk on quantum mechanics for seven year olds:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARWBdfWpDyc

    In the age of the Smart Phone, people are much more informed scientifically than they ever were before in history. Quantum mechanics is being described to 7 yr olds today, they will grow up with it as part of their standard base of knowledge. These are the post-Millenials, 7 year olds in 2019. They will have no problem understanding my technology when they reach college as freshmen (freshpeople/ freshstudents by then?)

  26. #3716
    Paradoxically Sublime Fool Turn13's Avatar
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    The benefit of that high-tech complexity in the brochure was making your own TV programs.

    Quote Originally Posted by Winfield
    The benefit is quantum understanding of energy storage enables a unique discharge equation, one which is extended via feedback from one electron quantum state's output to another electron quantum state's input, thus creating an entirely new second order differential equation of system discharge.
    Say what?

    Quote Originally Posted by Winfield
    The bottom line is this, your electric car, with a Classical physics based lithium battery pack, might go 235 miles at 55 MPH before it goes dead and stops. My quantum battery can power a Semi-truck at 75,000 pounds, at 57 MPH, for 8 consecutive hours on a single charge. (Purdue produced algorithm by Fan / Shen), using only a 300 gallon tank of my Dirac liquid ( a lithium-potassium molten salt).
    So will it fit in an IndyCar and make it go 240 mph for 2.5 hours? Or have I got the wrong idea? 300 gallons is 40 cubic feet.

    ps - it took 5 minutes in the video just to get to the question, "what is quantum physics" 11:30 in, and the 4 points of science communication!
    Last edited by Turn13; 01-12-2019 at 11:20 AM.

  27. #3717
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8RzTmeVWfM

    Here is the explanation of the internal combustion process, theoretical and practical. It is called a PV diagram, and includes two adiabatic and two isothermal processes (lecturer calls them isometric, that's not USA terminology). How many TF members actually understand this? To the point where they might draw and explain the Otto cycle thermodynamically on a blackboard? Darn few I'd imagine, and that's a 150 year old process. But that's what they're watching in the Indy 500, that's the heart of the allure of the event, cars going 230 MPH because someone understood the laws of thermodynamics.

    Now one might argue that people don't watch the 500 because of some innate fascination with thermodynamics, but I don't accept that. Put those same 33 drivers on bicycles (human powered) and see if that attracts 300,000 live gate. Obviously not, it wouldn't draw 1000 paying fans. it's thermodynamics they come to see, not drivers.

    BTW, I'm not operating a 75,000 semi truck on a racetrack, instead just a 1500 pound open wheel race car. 40 gallons should suffice, same as we carried in CART for all those years. And it gets recharged for approx. 10 seconds at every tire change, so total of a minute of high energy recharging for the 500 miles.

  28. #3718
    So you're thinking, wait, wut? People watching thermodynamics? They don't even know what that means. Obviously, they aren't watching physics on a blackboard, they are amazed at physics as it plays out on a racetrack. The human drivers simply add the differentiation between the entries, and have human interest stories to tell. But they don't sell the event, or the car owners would trade in this expensive Dallaras for carbon fiber bicycles, and save millions of dollars. Same drivers, right? If it isn't thermodynamics, then what is it?

    OK, the real underlying allure is the mastery of thermodynamics by humans, not the laws of thermodynamics, because most average people don't know them (but they sense them intuitively). They are amazed at the spectacle of the event, and the human courage it takes to strap one on and run it above qualifying speed. But no one comes JUST to view those humans circumnavigating the IMS, they come because they are amazed that people and machines can provide such a spectacle. And the real reason the 500 is such a spectacle is precisely due to the mastery of the laws of thermodynamics. Without thermodynamics the engines don't run, the cars don't go.

    Now just imagine for a moment the spectacle thermodynamics provided. IMS didn't invent the science of thermodynamics, scientists did. IMS capitalized on this to create a spectacle. Now if Classical thermodynamics draws a steady 250K plus every year, just imagine how many would show up to see quantum thermodynamics in action? Better start building more grandstands. Easily half a million would show (if they could all get in). SRO. Monster TV numbers, globally. Eclipsing F-1, F-E, and NASCAR. America as world leader in science and technology again. It's the best business case ever written.

  29. #3719
    People in media focus almost solely on personalities, it's the nature of the public relations industry. For instance, on my generic homepage, I get msm news as a default setting. Tells me what day it is, what the temperature outside is, and what the latest breaking news is (in their view). Now every single day, I see at least three (sometimes more) articles on Meghan Markle. More than the Queen, more than the heir to the throne, more than Theresa May the PM, more than the next Queen, Kate (but she's at least mentioned) This is how the media constructs celebrities. First is how you look, next is some reason why you should be interested in her. Meghan Markle has zero relevance to any citizens of the USA except those who might fantasize about becoming a Princess / Duchess in a foreign country, pure Tiara envy.

    But to the media, Meghan Markle is solid Gold, even Platinum maybe. She's the current clickbait leader in the media's endless fascination with celebrity, following the long reign of KimK and her photogenic family.

    So if you ask IndyCar fans, what is the draw of IndyCar? They will instantly respond: the DRIVERS, it's all about the drivers. Who or what else would it be about ? Today is NFL playoffs, Divisional Round. Luck, Mahomes, Brees, Dac, Foles, Rivers, Brady, Goff, the QB's are most often the human interest story, followed by the best athlete, RB, WR, TE or defensive standout player. And that's what the msm wants you to think. it's all about the celebrities WE the PR machine created.

    But it truly isn't, it's about the game and rules and action of professional football and the individual city-associated franchises. That was invented in the 1920's (NFL), no one remembers anyone from that timeframe except maybe George Halas, the founder of the game of pro football and the NFL. NFL football is just like the science of thermodynamics. It underpins the attraction. No one pays attention to the allure of the sport itself, they are too busy creating and then ignoring (as they wane in performance) talent as celebrity. The same is true of motorsports. The drivers are temporary celebrities, but unless they are strapped into a complex thermodynamic platform, they hold little genuine interest for most fans. Same with the NFL, the players are most relevant when they have a jersey and a logo helmet on.

    But fans would notice (and scream) immediately if the NFL players switched out NFL football for table tennis, even if they played TT with their colorful helmets on. The same is true with racing, very few would pay full ticket face value (for the 500) to watch the 33 qualified drivers racing bicycles. Celebrity and the basis of the sport (NFL football and thermodynamic engine racing) are two different things, celebrity creation depends on people being interested in the sporting activity FIRST, it is the foundation of the entire attraction, even if they themselves don't realize it.

    This is why the quantum engine would create an incredible atmosphere, like the moon landing or Broadway Joe's boasting about beating the Mighty Baltimore Colts in SBIII, cementing that event. Celebrities come and go, the attraction always remains, but it is indeed a bit more obscure. Ask yourself this, which would attract more fans, the 33 latest qualified drivers racing bicycles, or 33 autonomous cars racing at 240 MPH? In which case the programmers or engineers or even AI (if it spoke) would instantly become the "celebrities". You guessed it, the 33 autonomous cars would still attract a massive crowd, the bicycle race most certainly would not. I believe they tried it once before, Dick Simon was in it). Yawn.

    The real spectacle involves physics and scientific principals, and when those become obsolescent (like NASCAR) attention wanes. No amount of celebrity can rescue NASCAR, because the celebrity creation DEPENDS on the science underpinning the activity to be cutting edge. Like the RPO in this years NFL, it's new, it's exciting, and its best practicioners are now heroes (Mahomes, Trubisky, etc.) NASCAR cannot recover until it undergoes a total makeover, a talking AI car, a zero emission engine.
    Something people expect in the 21st century.


    Last edited by Winfield; 01-12-2019 at 03:09 PM.

  30. #3720
    Quote Originally Posted by Winfield View Post


    The bottom line is this, your electric car, with a Classical physics based lithium battery pack, might go 235 miles at 55 MPH before it goes dead and stops. My quantum battery can power a Semi-truck at 75,000 pounds, at 57 MPH, for 8 consecutive hours on a single charge. (Purdue produced algorithm by Fan / Shen), using only a 300 gallon tank of my Dirac liquid ( a lithium-potassium molten salt).
    Got it. Thanks.


    [Headline] Revolutionary QUANTUM BATTERY could Power an Electric Car from NYC to LA on a Single Charge


    I don’t know if your invention could do that, or prevent electric-grid blackouts, etc. But I do know this game is much easier when you’re fielding calls as opposed to making them.

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